The Wolf Prize laureates

// order posts by year $posts_by_year;

Dame Caroline Dean

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2020

The 2020 Wolf Prize in Mathematics is awarded jointly to Simon Donaldson and Yakov Eliashberg.

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson

Imperial College London and

Simons Center , Stony Brook , UK

 

“for their contributions to differential geometry and topology”

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson (born 1957, Cambridge, U.K.) is an English mathematician known for his work on the topology of smooth (differentiable) four-dimensional manifolds and Donaldson–Thomas theory.

 

Donaldson’s passion of youth was sailing. Through this, he became interested in the design of boats, and in turn in mathematics. Donaldson gained a BA degree in mathematics from Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1979, and in 1980 began postgraduate work at Worcester College, Oxford.

 

As a graduate student, Donaldson made a spectacular discovery on the nature or 4-dlmenslonal geometry and topology which is considered one of the great events of 20th century mathematics. He showed there are phenomena in 4-dlmenslons which have no counterpart in any other dimension. This was totally unexpected, running against the perceived wisdom of the time.

 

Not only did Donaldson make this discovery but he also produced new tools with which to study it, involving deep new ideas in global nonlinear analysis, topology, and algebraic geometry.

 

After gaining his DPhil degree from Oxford University in 1983, Donaldson was appointed a Junior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, he spent the academic year 1983–84 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and returned to Oxford as Wallis Professor of Mathematics in 1985. After spending one year visiting Stanford University, he moved to Imperial College London in 1998. Donaldson is currently a permanent member of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at Stony Brook University and a Professor in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London.

 

Donaldson’s work is remarkable in its reversal of the usual direction of ideas from mathematics being applied to solve problems in physics.

 

A trademark of Donaldson’s work is to use geometric ideas in infinite dimensions, and deep non-linear analysis, to give new ways to solve partial differential equations (PDE). In this way he used the Yang-Mills equations, which has its origin in quantum field theory, to solve problems in pure mathematics (Kähler manifolds) and changed our understanding of symplectic manifolds. These are the phase spaces of classical mechanics, and he has shown that large parts of the powerful theory of algebraic geometry can be extended to them.

 

Applying physics to problems or pure mathematics was a stunning reversal of the usual interaction between the subjects and has helped develop a new unification of the subjects over the last 20 years, resulting in great progress in both. His use of moduli (or parameter) spaces of solutions of physical equations – and the interpretation of this technique as a form of quantum field theory – is now pervasive throughout many branches of modem mathematics and physics as a way to produce “Donaldson-type Invariants” of geometries of all types. In the last 5 years he has been making great progress with special geometries crucial to string theory in dimensions six (“Donaldson-Thomas theory”), seven and eight.

 

Professor Simon Donaldson is awarded the Wolf Prize for his leadership in geometry in the last 35 years. His work has been a unique combination of novel ideas in global non-linear analysis, topology, algebraic geometry, and theoretical physics, following his fundamental work on 4-manifolds and gauge theory. Especially remarkable is his recent work on symplectic and Kähler geometry.

 

 

 

Allan H. MacDonald

Wolf Prize Laureate in Physics 2020

The 2020 Wolf Prize in Mathematics is awarded jointly to Simon Donaldson and Yakov Eliashberg.

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson

Imperial College London and

Simons Center , Stony Brook , UK

 

“for their contributions to differential geometry and topology”

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson (born 1957, Cambridge, U.K.) is an English mathematician known for his work on the topology of smooth (differentiable) four-dimensional manifolds and Donaldson–Thomas theory.

 

Donaldson’s passion of youth was sailing. Through this, he became interested in the design of boats, and in turn in mathematics. Donaldson gained a BA degree in mathematics from Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1979, and in 1980 began postgraduate work at Worcester College, Oxford.

 

As a graduate student, Donaldson made a spectacular discovery on the nature or 4-dlmenslonal geometry and topology which is considered one of the great events of 20th century mathematics. He showed there are phenomena in 4-dlmenslons which have no counterpart in any other dimension. This was totally unexpected, running against the perceived wisdom of the time.

 

Not only did Donaldson make this discovery but he also produced new tools with which to study it, involving deep new ideas in global nonlinear analysis, topology, and algebraic geometry.

 

After gaining his DPhil degree from Oxford University in 1983, Donaldson was appointed a Junior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, he spent the academic year 1983–84 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and returned to Oxford as Wallis Professor of Mathematics in 1985. After spending one year visiting Stanford University, he moved to Imperial College London in 1998. Donaldson is currently a permanent member of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at Stony Brook University and a Professor in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London.

 

Donaldson’s work is remarkable in its reversal of the usual direction of ideas from mathematics being applied to solve problems in physics.

 

A trademark of Donaldson’s work is to use geometric ideas in infinite dimensions, and deep non-linear analysis, to give new ways to solve partial differential equations (PDE). In this way he used the Yang-Mills equations, which has its origin in quantum field theory, to solve problems in pure mathematics (Kähler manifolds) and changed our understanding of symplectic manifolds. These are the phase spaces of classical mechanics, and he has shown that large parts of the powerful theory of algebraic geometry can be extended to them.

 

Applying physics to problems or pure mathematics was a stunning reversal of the usual interaction between the subjects and has helped develop a new unification of the subjects over the last 20 years, resulting in great progress in both. His use of moduli (or parameter) spaces of solutions of physical equations – and the interpretation of this technique as a form of quantum field theory – is now pervasive throughout many branches of modem mathematics and physics as a way to produce “Donaldson-type Invariants” of geometries of all types. In the last 5 years he has been making great progress with special geometries crucial to string theory in dimensions six (“Donaldson-Thomas theory”), seven and eight.

 

Professor Simon Donaldson is awarded the Wolf Prize for his leadership in geometry in the last 35 years. His work has been a unique combination of novel ideas in global non-linear analysis, topology, algebraic geometry, and theoretical physics, following his fundamental work on 4-manifolds and gauge theory. Especially remarkable is his recent work on symplectic and Kähler geometry.

 

 

 

Yakov Eliashberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The 2020 Wolf Prize in Mathematics is awarded jointly to Simon Donaldson and Yakov Eliashberg.

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson

Imperial College London and

Simons Center , Stony Brook , UK

 

“for their contributions to differential geometry and topology”

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson (born 1957, Cambridge, U.K.) is an English mathematician known for his work on the topology of smooth (differentiable) four-dimensional manifolds and Donaldson–Thomas theory.

 

Donaldson’s passion of youth was sailing. Through this, he became interested in the design of boats, and in turn in mathematics. Donaldson gained a BA degree in mathematics from Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1979, and in 1980 began postgraduate work at Worcester College, Oxford.

 

As a graduate student, Donaldson made a spectacular discovery on the nature or 4-dlmenslonal geometry and topology which is considered one of the great events of 20th century mathematics. He showed there are phenomena in 4-dlmenslons which have no counterpart in any other dimension. This was totally unexpected, running against the perceived wisdom of the time.

 

Not only did Donaldson make this discovery but he also produced new tools with which to study it, involving deep new ideas in global nonlinear analysis, topology, and algebraic geometry.

 

After gaining his DPhil degree from Oxford University in 1983, Donaldson was appointed a Junior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, he spent the academic year 1983–84 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and returned to Oxford as Wallis Professor of Mathematics in 1985. After spending one year visiting Stanford University, he moved to Imperial College London in 1998. Donaldson is currently a permanent member of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at Stony Brook University and a Professor in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London.

 

Donaldson’s work is remarkable in its reversal of the usual direction of ideas from mathematics being applied to solve problems in physics.

 

A trademark of Donaldson’s work is to use geometric ideas in infinite dimensions, and deep non-linear analysis, to give new ways to solve partial differential equations (PDE). In this way he used the Yang-Mills equations, which has its origin in quantum field theory, to solve problems in pure mathematics (Kähler manifolds) and changed our understanding of symplectic manifolds. These are the phase spaces of classical mechanics, and he has shown that large parts of the powerful theory of algebraic geometry can be extended to them.

 

Applying physics to problems or pure mathematics was a stunning reversal of the usual interaction between the subjects and has helped develop a new unification of the subjects over the last 20 years, resulting in great progress in both. His use of moduli (or parameter) spaces of solutions of physical equations – and the interpretation of this technique as a form of quantum field theory – is now pervasive throughout many branches of modem mathematics and physics as a way to produce “Donaldson-type Invariants” of geometries of all types. In the last 5 years he has been making great progress with special geometries crucial to string theory in dimensions six (“Donaldson-Thomas theory”), seven and eight.

 

Professor Simon Donaldson is awarded the Wolf Prize for his leadership in geometry in the last 35 years. His work has been a unique combination of novel ideas in global non-linear analysis, topology, algebraic geometry, and theoretical physics, following his fundamental work on 4-manifolds and gauge theory. Especially remarkable is his recent work on symplectic and Kähler geometry.

 

 

 

Emmanuelle Charpentier

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2020

The 2020 Wolf Prize in Mathematics is awarded jointly to Simon Donaldson and Yakov Eliashberg.

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson

Imperial College London and

Simons Center , Stony Brook , UK

 

“for their contributions to differential geometry and topology”

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson (born 1957, Cambridge, U.K.) is an English mathematician known for his work on the topology of smooth (differentiable) four-dimensional manifolds and Donaldson–Thomas theory.

 

Donaldson’s passion of youth was sailing. Through this, he became interested in the design of boats, and in turn in mathematics. Donaldson gained a BA degree in mathematics from Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1979, and in 1980 began postgraduate work at Worcester College, Oxford.

 

As a graduate student, Donaldson made a spectacular discovery on the nature or 4-dlmenslonal geometry and topology which is considered one of the great events of 20th century mathematics. He showed there are phenomena in 4-dlmenslons which have no counterpart in any other dimension. This was totally unexpected, running against the perceived wisdom of the time.

 

Not only did Donaldson make this discovery but he also produced new tools with which to study it, involving deep new ideas in global nonlinear analysis, topology, and algebraic geometry.

 

After gaining his DPhil degree from Oxford University in 1983, Donaldson was appointed a Junior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, he spent the academic year 1983–84 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and returned to Oxford as Wallis Professor of Mathematics in 1985. After spending one year visiting Stanford University, he moved to Imperial College London in 1998. Donaldson is currently a permanent member of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at Stony Brook University and a Professor in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London.

 

Donaldson’s work is remarkable in its reversal of the usual direction of ideas from mathematics being applied to solve problems in physics.

 

A trademark of Donaldson’s work is to use geometric ideas in infinite dimensions, and deep non-linear analysis, to give new ways to solve partial differential equations (PDE). In this way he used the Yang-Mills equations, which has its origin in quantum field theory, to solve problems in pure mathematics (Kähler manifolds) and changed our understanding of symplectic manifolds. These are the phase spaces of classical mechanics, and he has shown that large parts of the powerful theory of algebraic geometry can be extended to them.

 

Applying physics to problems or pure mathematics was a stunning reversal of the usual interaction between the subjects and has helped develop a new unification of the subjects over the last 20 years, resulting in great progress in both. His use of moduli (or parameter) spaces of solutions of physical equations – and the interpretation of this technique as a form of quantum field theory – is now pervasive throughout many branches of modem mathematics and physics as a way to produce “Donaldson-type Invariants” of geometries of all types. In the last 5 years he has been making great progress with special geometries crucial to string theory in dimensions six (“Donaldson-Thomas theory”), seven and eight.

 

Professor Simon Donaldson is awarded the Wolf Prize for his leadership in geometry in the last 35 years. His work has been a unique combination of novel ideas in global non-linear analysis, topology, algebraic geometry, and theoretical physics, following his fundamental work on 4-manifolds and gauge theory. Especially remarkable is his recent work on symplectic and Kähler geometry.

 

 

 

Cindy Sherman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Art 2020

The 2020 Wolf Prize in Mathematics is awarded jointly to Simon Donaldson and Yakov Eliashberg.

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson

Imperial College London and

Simons Center , Stony Brook , UK

 

“for their contributions to differential geometry and topology”

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson (born 1957, Cambridge, U.K.) is an English mathematician known for his work on the topology of smooth (differentiable) four-dimensional manifolds and Donaldson–Thomas theory.

 

Donaldson’s passion of youth was sailing. Through this, he became interested in the design of boats, and in turn in mathematics. Donaldson gained a BA degree in mathematics from Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1979, and in 1980 began postgraduate work at Worcester College, Oxford.

 

As a graduate student, Donaldson made a spectacular discovery on the nature or 4-dlmenslonal geometry and topology which is considered one of the great events of 20th century mathematics. He showed there are phenomena in 4-dlmenslons which have no counterpart in any other dimension. This was totally unexpected, running against the perceived wisdom of the time.

 

Not only did Donaldson make this discovery but he also produced new tools with which to study it, involving deep new ideas in global nonlinear analysis, topology, and algebraic geometry.

 

After gaining his DPhil degree from Oxford University in 1983, Donaldson was appointed a Junior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, he spent the academic year 1983–84 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and returned to Oxford as Wallis Professor of Mathematics in 1985. After spending one year visiting Stanford University, he moved to Imperial College London in 1998. Donaldson is currently a permanent member of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at Stony Brook University and a Professor in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London.

 

Donaldson’s work is remarkable in its reversal of the usual direction of ideas from mathematics being applied to solve problems in physics.

 

A trademark of Donaldson’s work is to use geometric ideas in infinite dimensions, and deep non-linear analysis, to give new ways to solve partial differential equations (PDE). In this way he used the Yang-Mills equations, which has its origin in quantum field theory, to solve problems in pure mathematics (Kähler manifolds) and changed our understanding of symplectic manifolds. These are the phase spaces of classical mechanics, and he has shown that large parts of the powerful theory of algebraic geometry can be extended to them.

 

Applying physics to problems or pure mathematics was a stunning reversal of the usual interaction between the subjects and has helped develop a new unification of the subjects over the last 20 years, resulting in great progress in both. His use of moduli (or parameter) spaces of solutions of physical equations – and the interpretation of this technique as a form of quantum field theory – is now pervasive throughout many branches of modem mathematics and physics as a way to produce “Donaldson-type Invariants” of geometries of all types. In the last 5 years he has been making great progress with special geometries crucial to string theory in dimensions six (“Donaldson-Thomas theory”), seven and eight.

 

Professor Simon Donaldson is awarded the Wolf Prize for his leadership in geometry in the last 35 years. His work has been a unique combination of novel ideas in global non-linear analysis, topology, algebraic geometry, and theoretical physics, following his fundamental work on 4-manifolds and gauge theory. Especially remarkable is his recent work on symplectic and Kähler geometry.

 

 

 

Pablo Jarillo-Herrero

Wolf Prize Laureate in Physics 2020

The 2020 Wolf Prize in Mathematics is awarded jointly to Simon Donaldson and Yakov Eliashberg.

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson

Imperial College London and

Simons Center , Stony Brook , UK

 

“for their contributions to differential geometry and topology”

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson (born 1957, Cambridge, U.K.) is an English mathematician known for his work on the topology of smooth (differentiable) four-dimensional manifolds and Donaldson–Thomas theory.

 

Donaldson’s passion of youth was sailing. Through this, he became interested in the design of boats, and in turn in mathematics. Donaldson gained a BA degree in mathematics from Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1979, and in 1980 began postgraduate work at Worcester College, Oxford.

 

As a graduate student, Donaldson made a spectacular discovery on the nature or 4-dlmenslonal geometry and topology which is considered one of the great events of 20th century mathematics. He showed there are phenomena in 4-dlmenslons which have no counterpart in any other dimension. This was totally unexpected, running against the perceived wisdom of the time.

 

Not only did Donaldson make this discovery but he also produced new tools with which to study it, involving deep new ideas in global nonlinear analysis, topology, and algebraic geometry.

 

After gaining his DPhil degree from Oxford University in 1983, Donaldson was appointed a Junior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, he spent the academic year 1983–84 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and returned to Oxford as Wallis Professor of Mathematics in 1985. After spending one year visiting Stanford University, he moved to Imperial College London in 1998. Donaldson is currently a permanent member of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at Stony Brook University and a Professor in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London.

 

Donaldson’s work is remarkable in its reversal of the usual direction of ideas from mathematics being applied to solve problems in physics.

 

A trademark of Donaldson’s work is to use geometric ideas in infinite dimensions, and deep non-linear analysis, to give new ways to solve partial differential equations (PDE). In this way he used the Yang-Mills equations, which has its origin in quantum field theory, to solve problems in pure mathematics (Kähler manifolds) and changed our understanding of symplectic manifolds. These are the phase spaces of classical mechanics, and he has shown that large parts of the powerful theory of algebraic geometry can be extended to them.

 

Applying physics to problems or pure mathematics was a stunning reversal of the usual interaction between the subjects and has helped develop a new unification of the subjects over the last 20 years, resulting in great progress in both. His use of moduli (or parameter) spaces of solutions of physical equations – and the interpretation of this technique as a form of quantum field theory – is now pervasive throughout many branches of modem mathematics and physics as a way to produce “Donaldson-type Invariants” of geometries of all types. In the last 5 years he has been making great progress with special geometries crucial to string theory in dimensions six (“Donaldson-Thomas theory”), seven and eight.

 

Professor Simon Donaldson is awarded the Wolf Prize for his leadership in geometry in the last 35 years. His work has been a unique combination of novel ideas in global non-linear analysis, topology, algebraic geometry, and theoretical physics, following his fundamental work on 4-manifolds and gauge theory. Especially remarkable is his recent work on symplectic and Kähler geometry.

 

 

 

Rafi Bistritzer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Physics 2020

The 2020 Wolf Prize in Mathematics is awarded jointly to Simon Donaldson and Yakov Eliashberg.

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson

Imperial College London and

Simons Center , Stony Brook , UK

 

“for their contributions to differential geometry and topology”

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson (born 1957, Cambridge, U.K.) is an English mathematician known for his work on the topology of smooth (differentiable) four-dimensional manifolds and Donaldson–Thomas theory.

 

Donaldson’s passion of youth was sailing. Through this, he became interested in the design of boats, and in turn in mathematics. Donaldson gained a BA degree in mathematics from Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1979, and in 1980 began postgraduate work at Worcester College, Oxford.

 

As a graduate student, Donaldson made a spectacular discovery on the nature or 4-dlmenslonal geometry and topology which is considered one of the great events of 20th century mathematics. He showed there are phenomena in 4-dlmenslons which have no counterpart in any other dimension. This was totally unexpected, running against the perceived wisdom of the time.

 

Not only did Donaldson make this discovery but he also produced new tools with which to study it, involving deep new ideas in global nonlinear analysis, topology, and algebraic geometry.

 

After gaining his DPhil degree from Oxford University in 1983, Donaldson was appointed a Junior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, he spent the academic year 1983–84 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and returned to Oxford as Wallis Professor of Mathematics in 1985. After spending one year visiting Stanford University, he moved to Imperial College London in 1998. Donaldson is currently a permanent member of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at Stony Brook University and a Professor in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London.

 

Donaldson’s work is remarkable in its reversal of the usual direction of ideas from mathematics being applied to solve problems in physics.

 

A trademark of Donaldson’s work is to use geometric ideas in infinite dimensions, and deep non-linear analysis, to give new ways to solve partial differential equations (PDE). In this way he used the Yang-Mills equations, which has its origin in quantum field theory, to solve problems in pure mathematics (Kähler manifolds) and changed our understanding of symplectic manifolds. These are the phase spaces of classical mechanics, and he has shown that large parts of the powerful theory of algebraic geometry can be extended to them.

 

Applying physics to problems or pure mathematics was a stunning reversal of the usual interaction between the subjects and has helped develop a new unification of the subjects over the last 20 years, resulting in great progress in both. His use of moduli (or parameter) spaces of solutions of physical equations – and the interpretation of this technique as a form of quantum field theory – is now pervasive throughout many branches of modem mathematics and physics as a way to produce “Donaldson-type Invariants” of geometries of all types. In the last 5 years he has been making great progress with special geometries crucial to string theory in dimensions six (“Donaldson-Thomas theory”), seven and eight.

 

Professor Simon Donaldson is awarded the Wolf Prize for his leadership in geometry in the last 35 years. His work has been a unique combination of novel ideas in global non-linear analysis, topology, algebraic geometry, and theoretical physics, following his fundamental work on 4-manifolds and gauge theory. Especially remarkable is his recent work on symplectic and Kähler geometry.

 

 

 

Sir Simon K. Donaldson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The 2020 Wolf Prize in Mathematics is awarded jointly to Simon Donaldson and Yakov Eliashberg.

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson

Imperial College London and

Simons Center , Stony Brook , UK

 

“for their contributions to differential geometry and topology”

 

Sir Simon Kirwan Donaldson (born 1957, Cambridge, U.K.) is an English mathematician known for his work on the topology of smooth (differentiable) four-dimensional manifolds and Donaldson–Thomas theory.

 

Donaldson’s passion of youth was sailing. Through this, he became interested in the design of boats, and in turn in mathematics. Donaldson gained a BA degree in mathematics from Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1979, and in 1980 began postgraduate work at Worcester College, Oxford.

 

As a graduate student, Donaldson made a spectacular discovery on the nature or 4-dlmenslonal geometry and topology which is considered one of the great events of 20th century mathematics. He showed there are phenomena in 4-dlmenslons which have no counterpart in any other dimension. This was totally unexpected, running against the perceived wisdom of the time.

 

Not only did Donaldson make this discovery but he also produced new tools with which to study it, involving deep new ideas in global nonlinear analysis, topology, and algebraic geometry.

 

After gaining his DPhil degree from Oxford University in 1983, Donaldson was appointed a Junior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford, he spent the academic year 1983–84 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and returned to Oxford as Wallis Professor of Mathematics in 1985. After spending one year visiting Stanford University, he moved to Imperial College London in 1998. Donaldson is currently a permanent member of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics at Stony Brook University and a Professor in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London.

 

Donaldson’s work is remarkable in its reversal of the usual direction of ideas from mathematics being applied to solve problems in physics.

 

A trademark of Donaldson’s work is to use geometric ideas in infinite dimensions, and deep non-linear analysis, to give new ways to solve partial differential equations (PDE). In this way he used the Yang-Mills equations, which has its origin in quantum field theory, to solve problems in pure mathematics (Kähler manifolds) and changed our understanding of symplectic manifolds. These are the phase spaces of classical mechanics, and he has shown that large parts of the powerful theory of algebraic geometry can be extended to them.

 

Applying physics to problems or pure mathematics was a stunning reversal of the usual interaction between the subjects and has helped develop a new unification of the subjects over the last 20 years, resulting in great progress in both. His use of moduli (or parameter) spaces of solutions of physical equations – and the interpretation of this technique as a form of quantum field theory – is now pervasive throughout many branches of modem mathematics and physics as a way to produce “Donaldson-type Invariants” of geometries of all types. In the last 5 years he has been making great progress with special geometries crucial to string theory in dimensions six (“Donaldson-Thomas theory”), seven and eight.

 

Professor Simon Donaldson is awarded the Wolf Prize for his leadership in geometry in the last 35 years. His work has been a unique combination of novel ideas in global non-linear analysis, topology, algebraic geometry, and theoretical physics, following his fundamental work on 4-manifolds and gauge theory. Especially remarkable is his recent work on symplectic and Kähler geometry.

 

 

 

Prizes and scholarships laureates

// order posts by year $posts_by_year;

Schraga Schwartz

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Kfir Blum

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Tomer Michaeli

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Yuval Filmus

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Meirav Zehavi

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Idan Hod

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Adam Teman

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Yasmine Meroz

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Yakir Hadad

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Yonit Hochberg

Winner of Krill Prize 2020

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Itzhak Tamo

Krill Prize Laureate 2018

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Amit Sever

Krill Prize Laureate 2018

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Meital Landau

Krill Prize Laureate 2018

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Charles E. Diesendruck

Krill Prize Laureate 2018

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Yakov Babichenko

Krill Prize Laureate 2018

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Ayelet Erez

Krill Prize Laureate 2018

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Adi Salomon

Krill Prize Laureate 2018

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

Elad Gross

Krill Prize Laureate 2018

Elad Gross

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mechanism-driven regulation of reactivity and selectivity in organocatalysis

The preparation of many materials that are essential for our daily life in a modern society, such as plastics, fuels and fertilizers, heavily relies on the use of catalysts. Although catalysts have been used in the chemical industry for more than a century, there are many details about their structure-reactivity correlations which are not yet clear. One of the questions that I find most intriguing in catalysis research is identifying how the physical and chemical properties of catalysts influence their reactivity. In order to address this goal I use state of the art spectroscopic tools to detect the locations in which chemical reactions occur on the surface of single particles. Using this approach, we have recently identified that chemical reactivity primarily occurs on the periphery of metallic particles while lower reactivity was recorded at the center of the particle. These conclusions will enable the development of optimized catalysts based on rational design.

gallery