Fumihiko Maki

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Prize Committee in Arts has unanimously decided that the prize will be equally shared by Giancarlo De Carlo and Fumihiko Maki.

Fumihiko Maki
University of Tokyo
Tokyo, Japan

“for their work which represents the spirit of an architecture that looks to the future without renouncing the past; brings about meaningful shapes and environments without forsaking human and social aspects and responds to universal issues without neglecting regional attributes.”

With unstable values and dubious notions prevailing in their field, Fumihiko Maki and Giancarlo De Carlo, each in his own way and in different corners of the world, have succeeded in reaching invaluable achievements, which successfully augment the scale of the modern movement in architecture thus constituting its legitimate extension – most reasonable sequel.

Within the spectacular panorama of contemporary architecture in Japan, Fumihiko Maki is the steadiest major figure. Excellence is the hallmark of his searching mind and modest personality. Maki’s buildings are ingenious, precise, sensitive and exquisitely made. They are welcomingly proportioned (very large ones remaining gracefully humane) but also lively, cheerful and pleasantly experimental exciting in a quiet sophisticated sort of way. Since Maki is a master of imaginative logic, there is still room for wonder within what is essentially reasonable. Above all, his work is wide open to the future and never either nostalgically close to the past or crudely separated from it; nor is it ever ponderous or even remotely rhetorical.

Maki knows the world – and within it his own country. He is, in fact, equally attuned to both, which is one clue to his remarkably balanced achievements. In the field of urbanism and mass housing, Maki’s thesis on Group Form left an early mark. As a teacher he is cherished in both Japan and the U.S.

Architecture

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Moshe Safdie

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2019

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Phyllis Lambert

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2016

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Eduardo Souto de Mouro

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2013

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Peter Eisenman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

David Chipperfield

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jean Nouvel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2005

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Álvaro Siza

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2001

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frei Otto

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Aldo Van Eyck

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997/8

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Denys Lasdun

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jorn Utzon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frank O. Gehry

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Giancarlo De Carlo

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Fumihiko Maki

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Ralph Erskine

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1983/4

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.