Hans Lewy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1984/5

The Mathematics Prize Committee for 1984/5 recommends unanimously that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics be shared jointly by Kunihiko Kodaira and Hans Lewy.

Hans Lewy
University of California at Berkeley
Berkeley, California, USA

“for initiating many, now classic and essential, developments in partial differential equations.”

Working in Germany in the 1920’s and subsequently in the United States, Professor Hans Lewy has laid the foundations to some of the most fruitful theories in partial differential equations and their applications. His early work with Courant and Friedrichs, 1928, heralded the development of numerical methods for solving partial differential equations and later led to a stability theory for finite difference equations. He produced the famous example of a smooth linear partial differential equation having no solution. His other contributions include the study of the Monge-Ampere equation, work in fluid dynamics and the theory of cavities, and an early study of variational inequalities. In all these topics his ideas, have been fundamental and his results most original.

Mathematics

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Yakov Eliashberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Simon K. Donaldson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean Francois le Gall

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Gregory Lawler

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Vladimir Drinfeld

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Alexander Beilinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Richard Schoen

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Charles Fefferman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

James G. Arthur

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2015

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Peter Sarnak

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2014

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Artin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

George D. Mostow

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Aschbacher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Luis Caffarelli

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Shing-Tung Yau

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Dennis Sullivan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Pierre R. Deligne

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Phillip A. Griffiths

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.