Aldo Van Eyck

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997/8

The Prize Committee for Architecture has unanimously decided that the Wolf Prize for 1997/8 be jointly awarded to Architect Aldo Van Eyck and Architect Frei Otto.

 

Architect Aldo Van Eyck
Amsterdam, The Netherland

 

“for their fundamental structural contributions to the advancement of contemporary architecture as a social and technical art form in the evolution of theTwentieth Century.”

 

Professor Aldo van Eyck, studied at ETH Zurich from 1938 to 1943 and then worked for the Public Works Department from 1946-1950. He opened his own office in 1952 and eight years later designed his canonical children’s orphanage in Amsterdam which was based on a form of cellular aggregation more commonly found in pre-industrial, vernacular culture than in the main stream of European architecture.

 

Influenced in some measure by certain tribal settlement patterns in North America – in particular the Dogon Society – van Eyck founded the school of Structural Rationalism, a movement that was to find a particular following in Holland. This approach was centered around the magazine Forum, which he edited from 1959 to 1967, and the School of Architecture of the Technical University of Delft, which he served as a professor throughout his career. These two centers of influence gained him a wide following among a younger generation of Dutch architects, including Piet Blom, Herman Hertzberger and Theo Bosch. At the age of 78, he continues active practice today, in partnership with his wife Hannie van Eyck.

Architecture

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Moshe Safdie

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2019

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Phyllis Lambert

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2016

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Eduardo Souto de Mouro

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2013

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Peter Eisenman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

David Chipperfield

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jean Nouvel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2005

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Álvaro Siza

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2001

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frei Otto

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Aldo Van Eyck

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997/8

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Denys Lasdun

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jorn Utzon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frank O. Gehry

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Giancarlo De Carlo

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Fumihiko Maki

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Ralph Erskine

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1983/4

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.