Anthony J. Pawson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2005

The Prize Committee for Medicine has unanimously decided that the 2005 Wolf Prize will be jointly awarded, in equal parts, to three scientists: Alexander Levitzki, Anthony R. Hunter and Anthony J. Pawson.

 

Anthony J. Pawson
The Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital
Toronto, Canada

 

“for his discovery of protein domains essential for mediating protein-protein interactions in cellular signaling pathways, and the insights this research has provided into cancer.”

 

Over recent decades, an understanding of the biological bases of cancers and the provision of rational therapies to combat them, has proved a major challenge for medical science. Two recipients of the 2005 Wolf Prize for Medicine, Professors Hunter and Pawson, have each independently contributed to an understanding of the tyrosine kinase signaling pathways in biology and the effect of their disruption on the development of certain cancers. The third recipient, Professor Levitzki, has pioneered the development of small molecule inhibitors of tyrosine phosphorylation that block the disrupted pathways associated with cancer and thus provide effective therapies.

 

Anthony J. Pawson demonstrated that a conserved sequence domain is required for an oncogene to transform, as it directs the cellular activity of the kinase domain. He showed that the SH2 domain binds specifically to phosphotyrosine, leading to a completely new way of connecting signal transduction to cell transformation.

 

Medicine

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Emmanuelle Charpentier

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2020

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jennifer Doudna

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2020

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jeffrey M. Friedman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

James P. Allison

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2017

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Lewis Cantley

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

C. Ronald Kahn

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

John Kappler

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2015

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Philippa Marrack

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2015

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jeffrey Ravetch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2015

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Victor Ambros

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Nahum Sonenberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Gary Ruvkun

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Ronald M. Evans

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Shinya Yamanaka

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Rudolf Jaenisch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Axel Ullrich

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2010

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Howard Cedar

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Aharon Razin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Anthony R. Hunter

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Anthony J. Pawson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Alexander Levitzki

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Roger Y. Tsien

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2004

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Robert A. Weinberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2004

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Ralph L. Brinster

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2002/3

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Oliver Smithies

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2002/3

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Mario R. Capecchi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2002/3

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Avram Hershko

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Alexander Varshavsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Eric R. Kandel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1999

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Ruth Arnon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Michael Sela

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Mary F. Lyon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1997/8

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Stanley B. Prusiner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1996/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Yasutomi Nishizuka

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Michael J. Berridge

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

M. Judah Folkman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1992

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Seymour Benzer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1991

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Maclyn McCarty

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1990

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

John B. Gurdon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Edward B. Lewis

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Henri-Gery Hers

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Elizabeth F. Neufeld

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Pedro Cuatrecasas

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Meir Wilchek

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Osamu Hayaishi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1986

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Donald F. Steiner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1984/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Solomon H. Snyder

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Sir James W. Black

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jean-Pierre Changeux

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Stanley N. Cohen

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1981

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Barbara McClintock

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1981

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Leo Sachs

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1980

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Sir James L. Gowans

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1980

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Cesar Milstein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1980

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Roger W. Sperry

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1979

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Oleh Hornykiewicz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1979

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Arvid Carlsson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1979

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jon J.van Rood

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1978

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jean Dausset

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1978

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

George D.Snell

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1978

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.