Eric R. Kandel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1999

The Prize Committee for Medicine has unanimously decided that the Prize for 1999 be awarded to:

 

Eric R. Kandel
Columbia University
New York, N.Y., USA

 

“for the elucidation of the organismic, cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby short term memory is converted to a long term form.”

 

Employing the marine snail, Aplysia, Professor Eric R. Kandel developed a simple experimental model for the gill and siphon withdrawal reflex in response to stimulation. He studied three forms of learning with this system: habituation, sensitization and classical conditioning. He reconstructed the wiring of neurons used in this set of reflex behaviors and demonstrated that short term memory involves increased transmitter release from pre-existing synaptic connections while long term memory involves growth of new synaptic connections. Simple forms of learning produce these changes by modulating the strength of specific neuronal connections. Following up these studies at the organismic-behavioral level and the cellular network level, Kandel turned his attention to the subcellular and molecular basis of memory. He demonstrated that release of serotonin and the peptide SCP by presynaptic neurons results in increased levels of cyclic AMP and the stimulation of the cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase in the sensory neurons. Repeated release of neurotransmitters results in enhanced covalent modification of proteins. Kandel then identified the critical substrates for this protein kinase including the S-type K+ channel and CREB-like transcription factors. The short term to long term memory switch depends upon translocation of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit into the nucleus and phosphorylated CREB mediated transcription. This in turn results in the induction of the C/EBP transcription factor which has been shown to be essential for the self-sustained maintenance of the long term facilitation of memory. These studies, carried out over thirty years, relate behavior at the organismic level to events at the molecular level. Recently these same molecular events were shown to play a similar role in learning by Drosophila and in the mammalian brain, thus extending the generalization of this research.

Medicine

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Emmanuelle Charpentier

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2020

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jennifer Doudna

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2020

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jeffrey M. Friedman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

James P. Allison

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2017

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Lewis Cantley

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

C. Ronald Kahn

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

John Kappler

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2015

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Philippa Marrack

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2015

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jeffrey Ravetch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2015

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Victor Ambros

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Nahum Sonenberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Gary Ruvkun

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Ronald M. Evans

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Shinya Yamanaka

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Rudolf Jaenisch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Axel Ullrich

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2010

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Howard Cedar

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Aharon Razin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Anthony R. Hunter

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Anthony J. Pawson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Alexander Levitzki

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Roger Y. Tsien

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2004

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Robert A. Weinberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2004

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Ralph L. Brinster

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2002/3

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Oliver Smithies

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2002/3

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Mario R. Capecchi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2002/3

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Avram Hershko

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Alexander Varshavsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Eric R. Kandel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1999

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Ruth Arnon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Michael Sela

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Mary F. Lyon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1997/8

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Stanley B. Prusiner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1996/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Yasutomi Nishizuka

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Michael J. Berridge

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

M. Judah Folkman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1992

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Seymour Benzer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1991

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Maclyn McCarty

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1990

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

John B. Gurdon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Edward B. Lewis

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Henri-Gery Hers

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Elizabeth F. Neufeld

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Pedro Cuatrecasas

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Meir Wilchek

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Osamu Hayaishi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1986

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Donald F. Steiner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1984/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Solomon H. Snyder

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Sir James W. Black

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jean-Pierre Changeux

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Stanley N. Cohen

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1981

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Barbara McClintock

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1981

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Leo Sachs

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1980

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Sir James L. Gowans

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1980

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Cesar Milstein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1980

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Roger W. Sperry

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1979

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Oleh Hornykiewicz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1979

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Arvid Carlsson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1979

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jon J.van Rood

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1978

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

Jean Dausset

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1978

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.

George D.Snell

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 1978

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided to award the first Wolf Prize in Medicine jointly to: George D. Snell , Jean Dausset and Jon J. van Rood

 

George D. Snell
Jackson Laboratory
Bar Harbor, Maine, USA

 

for discovery of H-2 antigens, which codes for major transplantation antigens and the onset of the immune response.

 

Dr. George Snell discovered and described in mice the H-2 antigens, the structure which codes for major transplantation antigens carrier genes. These genes are essential in the onset of the immune response and therefore mechanism of defense.

 

The investigation of histocompatibility antigens in humans, led ProfessorJ. Dausset in Paris and Professor Van Rood in Leiden to the discovery and description of a model similar to that in mice, the HL-A system. This is the major histocompatibility complex in man, and its primordial role in organ transplantation has been extensively established and eva luated. Moreover, the association of HL-A antigens to the mechanisms governing the incidence of a number of diseases is under active research.

 

These investigations are a major breakthrough in the understanding of modern genetics and have opened new avenues for adequate matching of organ and tissue transplantation and for possible control and prevention of certain diseases.

 

The name of the late Peter Gorer, the British scientist who was among the founders of this field will be linked forever to the pillars of medical genetics.