Frank O. Gehry

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Prize Committee for Arts (Architecture) has unanimously decided that the Prize for 1992 be equally divided among: Frank O. Gehry ,Frank O. Gehry and Denys Lasdun.

 

Frank O. Gehry
Santa Monica, California, USA

 

“Creating architecture as art and sculpture, he embodies the fight for liberation destroying dogma, principle and method.”

 

Although each deserves the prize alone, it was felt that their creative stature would be identified best through comparison; even through the actual contrast of diverse and opposite qualities. Three men, three leaders, three permanent references in the wavering research of modern architecture. Humanly, psychologically and in their forms, they are very different. But they have one thing in common: the consistency of looking for ever extended fields of freedom.

 

Frank O. Gehry receives and transforms stimuli, but he also provokes them. All the world looks at him because, among many qualities, he has those of certitude and conflict. Gehry is there to destroy dogma, principle and method. Rather than freedom, he embodies the fight for liberation, no matter what it costs in terms of social relations or professional interest. Doing or undoing, constructivism or deconstructivism: his behaviour is an example, a light for all.

 

Three architects, three architectural languages, three different positions in space, time and architectural tradition – but three reminders as well in a period which suffers from the facile reuse of images, that the art of architecture can aspire to qualities existing well beyond the range of passing fashion – qualities that enhance use, transform construction, intensify meaning and liberate the mind.

Architecture

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Moshe Safdie

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2019

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Phyllis Lambert

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2016

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Eduardo Souto de Mouro

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2013

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Peter Eisenman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

David Chipperfield

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jean Nouvel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2005

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Álvaro Siza

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2001

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frei Otto

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Aldo Van Eyck

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997/8

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Denys Lasdun

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jorn Utzon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frank O. Gehry

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Giancarlo De Carlo

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Fumihiko Maki

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Ralph Erskine

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1983/4

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.