Fuller W. Bazer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2002/3

The Prize Committee for Agriculture has unanimously decided that the 2002/3 Wolf Prize be jointly awarded to: Fuller W. Bazer and R. Michael Roberts.

Fuller W. Bazer
Texas Agricultural Experiment Station
Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas, USA

“for discoveries of Interferon-t and other pregnancy-associated proteins, which clarified the biological mystery of signaling between embryo and mother to maintain pregnancy, with profound effects on the efficiency of animal production systems, as well as human health and well-being.”

The Prize Committee for Agriculture has unanimously decided that the 2002/3 Wolf Prize be jointly awarded to: Fuller W. Bazer and R. Michael Roberts.R. Michael Roberts.

R. Michael Roberts

Department of Animal Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, Missouri, USA

“for discoveries of Interferon-t and other pregnancy-associated proteins, which clarified the biological mystery of signaling between embryo and mother to maintain pregnancy, with profound effects on the efficiency of animal production systems, as well as human health and well-being.”

Professors Fuller W. Bazer and R. Michael Roberts are co-recipients of the Wolf Foundation Prize, in recognition of their seminal contributions in clarifying the biological mystery of embryo-maternal signaling, that leads to the maintenance of pregnancy and to the survival of the embryo in livestock species. While it has long been known that chemical communication between embryo and mother was essential for a successful pregnancy in mammals, little was known about the details of the process, before these two scientists began a collaboration to elucidate on these relationships.

After a period of intensive joint efforts, lasting 16 years, each has continued to make important independent contributions, at Texas A&M University and at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Among his key discoveries, Bazer isolated a uterine protein called uteroferrin and identified that it is a hematopoietic growth factor that influences the survival of the neonate and may be useful in treating diseases, such as leukemia and osteoporosis. Roberts determined that uteroferrin was identical to a class of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatases (TRAPs), subsequently purified, sequenced and cloned in humans. This has led to the screening of postmenopausal women for TRAP, elevated in association with osteoporosis. Bazer determined that estrogen in pigs and interferon-t in ruminant species, are the signals for pregnancy maintenance. The ability of interferon-t to suppress transcription of the estrogen receptor gene, provides a model for potential treatment of estrogen-dependent tumors. Roberts cloned, identified, and characterized the temporal expression of trophoblast interferon-t in sheep and cattle. His studies related to differential transcriptional regulation of interferon-t by ETS-2 and Oct-4 transcription factors, has led to the identification of a putative developmental switch that may lead to the formation of trophectoderm in early embryo development. Roberts has identified at least 100 expressed genes for pregnancy-associated proteins in the aspartyl proteinase gene family, some of which hold promise as a basis for an accurate and sensitive pregnancy test. Robert’s research on sexual dimorphism in embryos has led to the discovery that the mother’s diet (e.g., fat) close to the time of conception, may play a role in selecting the offspring’s sex.

The Wolf Foundation Prize Co-Awardees have created each a legacy of trained scientists, that are playing leadership roles in both agriculture and biomedicine. F.W. Bazer and R. Michael Roberts exemplify how devotion to basic research in agriculture can lead to practical outcomes that impact both animal production, as well as human health and well-being.

Agriculture

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Dame Caroline Dean

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2020

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

David Zilberman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2019

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Gene Robinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2018

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Trudy Mackay

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2016

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Linda J. Saif

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2015

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Leif Andersson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2014

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Jorge Dubcovsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2014

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Joachim Messing

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2013

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Jared M. Diamond

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2013

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

James R. Cook

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2011

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Harris A. Lewin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2011

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Sir David Baulcombe

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2010

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

W. Joe Lewis

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2008

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

John A. Pickett

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2008

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

James H. Tumlinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2008

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Ronald L. Phillips

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2006/7

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Michel A. J. Georges

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2006/7

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Steven D. Tanksley

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2004

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Yuan Longping

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2004

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Fuller W. Bazer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2002/3

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

R. Michael Roberts

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2002/3

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Roger N. Beachy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2001

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

James E. Womack

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2001

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Gurdev S. Khush

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2000

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Ilan Chet

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1998

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Baldur R. Stefansson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1998

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Neal L. First

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1996/7

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Morris Schnitzer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1995/6

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Frank J. Stevenson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1995/6

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Perry L. Adkisson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1994/5

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Carl B. Huffaker

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1994/5

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

John E. Casida

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1993

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Shang-Fa Yang

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1991

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Jozef S. Schell

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1990

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Peter M. Biggs

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1989

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Michael Elliott

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1989

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Christopher Polge

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1988

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Charles Thibault

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1988

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Theodor O. Diener

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1987

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Ralph Riley

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1986

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Ernest R. Sears

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1986

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Robert H. Burris

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1984/5

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Don Kirkham

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1983/4

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Cornelis T. De Wit

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1983/4

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Wendell L. Roelofs

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1982

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

John O. Almquist

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1981

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Henry A. Lardy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1981

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Glen W. Salisbury

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1981

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Karl Maramorosch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1980

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Sir Kenneth Blaxter

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1979

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Jay L. Lush

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1979

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

John C. Walker

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1978

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

George F.Sprague

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1978

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture : George F. Sprague and John C. Walker

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.”

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.