Harry B. Gray

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2004

The Prize Committee for Chemistry has unanimously decided that the 2004 Wolf Prize be awarded to:

Harry B. Gray
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena, California, USA

“for pioneering work in bio-inorganic chemistry, unravelling novel principles of structure and long-range electron transfer in proteins.”

A pioneer of bio-inorganic chemistry, Professor Harry Gray has made a critical contribution to our understanding of electron transfer in proteins and their folding.

To work its decipherable miracles, to effect change, and to create complexity and difference, life needs electrons, ions, atoms, and energy. From these, it constructs molecules of defined shapes and precise functions. The critical role of inorganic chemistry in these processes was recognized only recently.

In biological systems, inorganic components are essential. In hemoglobin, out of a total 9,072 atoms, there are only four iron atoms. These, however, play a critical role. Similarly, minute amounts of zinc, magnesium, calcium, copper and manganese, as well as other metal ions, play critical roles. When nature needs to accomplish a task that requires electron transfer, or where big energy jumps are essential, this is made possible by metal ion chemistry. From hemoglobin to chlorophyll, from zinc fingers to respiration, one finds important bio-inorganic chemistry in the service of life. Electron transfer reactions in proteins provide the basis for energy production and much of the intermediary metabolism in cells of all living organisms and plants. Until Gray’s work, little was known about the chemical factors, which govern electron transfer in biological systems.

Gray has made seminal contributions to the understanding of chemical bonding of metal complexes, mechanisms of inorganic reactions, spectroscopy and magneto-chemistry of inorganic compounds. His study of the first trigonal prismatic complexes is one such example. Through these achievements alone, coupled with a vivacious, interactive personality (that has also served him well as he brought, with enthusiasm, chemistry to the general public), he has established himself as one of the world’s leading chemists.

But Harry Gray’s most significant work lies at the interface between chemistry and biology. As a pioneer of the important and thriving field of bio-inorganic chemistry, he has made many key contributions, the most important of which is the development of fundamental understanding of electron transfer in biological systems, at the atomic level.

Harry Gray has developed methods for binding electron transfer-active metal complexes to the surface of proteins and has prepared proteins (variants of myoglobin and cytochromes) in which ruthenium complexes, amenable to activation by light, were placed at defined locations. Using these systems, he reported the first measurement of an electron transfer rate between two sites located at a fixed known distance in a protein; and has. systematically investigated the distance dependence of long range protein electron transfer and its free energy dependence. Gray has experimentally established, the mechanism of tunnelling as the transport of holes through the protein’s covalent bonds. He has demonstrated that electron transfer in proteins can occur with significant rates between centers separated by distances of up to 20 Ångströms. Gray’s work has provided insight into how the electron transfer rate depends on the separation of the redox centers and on the composition of the intervening material. Further, using laser-induced electron transfer as a tool, he has developed a method for triggering protein folding by light, enabling the study of early events of protein folding, which is central to protein structure and function. Gray’s work on electron transfer in biomolecules, is a striking demonstration of the power of modern physical tools and inorganic chemistry, applied to a critical biological problem. Ingenious chemistry, meticulously executed, has given us real understanding, for the first time, of biological processes of great significance for life.

Chemistry

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Stephen L. Buchwald

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John F. Hartwig

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Omar M. Yaghi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2018

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Makoto Fujita

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2018

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Robert G. Bergman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2017

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Stuart L. Schreiber

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

K. C. Nicolaou

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Chi-huey Wong

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Robert S. Langer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2013

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

A. Paul Alivisatos

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Charles M. Lieber

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Stuart A. Rice

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Krzysztof Matyjaszewski

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ching W. Tang

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

William E. Moerner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Allen J. Bard

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

George Feher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2006/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ada Yonath

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2006/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard Zare

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Harry B. Gray

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2004

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ryoji Noyori

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

K. Barry Sharpless

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Henri B. Kagan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

F. Albert Cotton

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2000

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Raymond U. Lemieux

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1999

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gerhard Ertl

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gabor A. Somorjai

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Samuel J. Danishefsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gilbert Stork

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard A. Lerner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1994/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Peter S. Schultz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1994/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ahmed H. Zewail

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1993

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John A. Pople

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1992

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard R. Ernst

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1991

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Alexander Pines

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1991

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Duilio Arigoni

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Alan R. Battersby

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Raphael D. Levine

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Joshua Jortner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

David C. Phillips

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

David M. Blow

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Elias J. Corey

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1986

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Albert Eschenmoser

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1986

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Rudolph A. Marcus

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1984/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John S. Waugh

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1983/4

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Herbert S. Gutowsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1983/4

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Harden M. McConnell

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1983/4

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John C. Polanyi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

George C. Pimentel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Joseph Chatt

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1981

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Henry Eyring

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1980

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Herman F. Mark

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1979

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Carl Djerassi

Wolf Prize Laurate in Chemistry 1978

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.