Jean Nouvel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2005

The Prize Committee for Architecture has unanimously decided that the 2005 Wolf Prize in Arts will be awarded to

Jean Nouvel
Paris, France

“for providing a new model of contextualism and redefining the dialectic between the two salient characteristics of contemporary architecture: concreteness and ephemerality.”

With his “principle of inclusion”, Jean Nouvel deploys the richest of palettes available to the contemporary architect. In each of his proposals and works, the result is exceptional. Nouvel does not impose a priori forms or materials. For him, architectural form follows neither from the architect’s vocabulary, nor from a predictable response to context. Rather, the proposed and the pre-existing interact to produce a result characterized by new material assemblages. His buildings acquire a life of their own, by establishing surprising atmospheric contrasts between interior and surroundings, and between discrete architectural spaces and the metropolitan network in which they are situated.

Rapidly changing modes of computational communication imply an astonishing range of spatial variables. Nouvel responds by giving definition to a variety of programmatic demands. He demonstrates the distinctive capacity of architecture to test and sustain technological advancements in spatial and material terms. His architecture is infused with hitherto unforeseen potentials of a new, digitally transformed world. Experimental engineering and inventive methods of assembly are combined to produce a three-dimensional reality that shares an affinity with the virtual, imaginary one. The production of images, light and sound, is unified with the plastic definition of space, to create a distinctively ‘ambiguous’ situation. Ultimately, what is uniquely effective in the work of Nouvel is the role it has played in forming a new model of contextualism. It distinguishes itself from more traditional models by means of novel interventions, aimed at reformulating the dialectic between the two reigning parameters of the digital universe: concreteness and ephemerality.

Architecture

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Moshe Safdie

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2019

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Phyllis Lambert

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2016

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Eduardo Souto de Mouro

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2013

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Peter Eisenman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

David Chipperfield

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jean Nouvel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2005

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Álvaro Siza

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2001

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frei Otto

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Aldo Van Eyck

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997/8

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Denys Lasdun

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jorn Utzon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frank O. Gehry

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Giancarlo De Carlo

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Fumihiko Maki

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Ralph Erskine

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1983/4

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.