Pierre R. Deligne

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee for Mathematics has unanimously decided that the 2008 Wolf Prize will be jointly awarded to: David B. Mumford, Pierre R. Deligne and Phillip A. Griffiths.

 

Pierre R. Deligne
Institute for Advanced Study
Princeton, New Jersey, USA

 

“for his work on mixed Hodge theory; the Weil conjectures; the Riemann-Hilbert correspondence; and for his contributions to arithmetic.”

 

Central to modern algebraic geometry is the theory of moduli, i.e., variation of algebraic or analytic structure. This theory was traditionally mysterious and problematic. In critical special cases, i.e., curves, it made sense, i.e., the set of curves of genus greater than one had a natural algebraic structure. In dimensions greater than one, there was some sort of structure locally, but globally everything remained mysterious. The two main (and closely related) approaches to moduli were invariant theory on the one hand and periods of abelian integrals on the other. This key problem was tackled and greatly elucidated by Deligne, Griffiths, and Mumford.

 

Professor David B. Mumford revolutionized the algebraic approach through invariant theory, which he renamed ‘geometric invariant theory.’ With this approach, he provided a complicated prescription for the construction of moduli in the algebraic case. As one application he proved that there were a set of equations defining the space of curves, with integer coefficients. Most important, Mumford showed that moduli spaces, though often very complicated, exist except for what, after his work, are well-understood exceptions. This framework is critical for the work by Griffiths and Deligne. Classically, the moduli space of curves was parameterized by using periods of the abelian integrals on them. Mathematicians, e.g., the Wolf Prize winner Andre Weil, have unsuccessfully tried to generalize the periods to higher dimensions.

 

Professor Phillip A. Griffiths had the fundamental insight that the Hodge filtration measured against the integer homology generalizes the classical periods of integrals. Moreover, he realized that the period mapping had a natural generalization as a map into a classifying space for variations of Hodge structure, with a new non-classical restriction imposed by the Kodaira-Spencer class action. This led to a great deal of work in complex differential geometry, e.g., his basic work with Deligne, John Morgan, and Dennis Sullivan on rational homotopy theory of compact Kaehler manifolds.

 

Building on Mumford´s and Griffiths´ work, Professor Pierre R. Deligne demonstrated how to extend the variation of Hodge theory to singular varieties. This advance, called mixed Hodge theory, allowed explicit calculation on the singular compactification of moduli spaces that came up in Mumford´s geometric invariant theory, which is called the Deligne-Mumford compactification. These ideas assisted Deligne in proving several other major results, e.g., the Riemann-Hilbert correspondence and the Weil conjectures.

Mathematics

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Yakov Eliashberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Sir Simon K. Donaldson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean Francois le Gall

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Gregory Lawler

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Vladimir Drinfeld

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Alexander Beilinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Richard Schoen

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Charles Fefferman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

James G. Arthur

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2015

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Peter Sarnak

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2014

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Artin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

George D. Mostow

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Aschbacher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Luis Caffarelli

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Shing-Tung Yau

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Dennis Sullivan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Pierre R. Deligne

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Phillip A. Griffiths

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

David B. Mumford

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hillel (Harry) Furstenberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2006/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Stephen Smale

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2006/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Gregory Margulis

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2005

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Sergei Novikov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2005

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mikio Sato

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2002/3

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John Tate

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2002/3

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Vladimir Arnold

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2001

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Saharon Shelah

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2001

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Raoul Bott

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2000

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean-Pierre Serre

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2000

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Laszlo Lovasz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1999

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Elias M. Stein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1999

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Yakov G. Sinai

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1996/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Joseph B. Keller

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1996/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Robert P. Langlands

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1995/6

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andrew J. Wiles

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1995/6

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jurgen K. Moser

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1994/5

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mikhael Gromov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1993

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jacques Tits

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1993

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lennart A. E. Carleson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1992

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John G. Thompson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1992

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Ilya Piatetski-Shapiro

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1990

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Ennio De Giorgi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1990

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John W. Milnor

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1989

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Alberto P. Calderon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1989

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lars Hörmander

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathemstics 1988

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Friedrich Hirzebruch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1988

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Peter D. Lax

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1987

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Kiyoshi Ito

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1987

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Samuel Eilenberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1986

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Atle Selberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1986

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Kunihiko Kodaira

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1984/5

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hans Lewy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1984/5

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Shiing-Shen Chern

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1983

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Paul Erdos

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1983/4

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mark G. Krein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1982

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hassler Whitney

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1982

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Oscar Zariski

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1981

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lars V. Ahlfors

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1981

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Henri cartan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1980

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andrey N. Kolmogorov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1980

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean Leray

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1979

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

André Weil

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1979

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Israel M. Gelfand

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1978

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Carl L. Siegel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1978

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.