Stephen Smale

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2006/7

The Prize Committee for Mathematics has unanimously decided that the 2006/7 Wolf Prize will be jointly awarded to: Harry Furstenberg and Stephen Smale.

 

Stephen Smale
University of California at Berkeley
Berkeley, California, USA

 

“for his groundbreaking contributions that have played a fundamental role in shaping differential topology, dynamical systems, mathematical economics, and other subjects in mathematics”

 

Professor Stephen Smale contributed greatly, in the late 50’s and early 60’s, to the development of differential topology, a field then in its infancy. His results of immersions of spheres in Euclidean spaces still intrigue mathematicians, as witnessed by recent films and pictures on his so-called “eversion” of the sphere. His proof of the Poincaré Conjecture for dimensions bigger or equal to 5 is one of the great mathematical achievements of the 20th Century. His h-cobordism theorem has become probably the most basic tool in differential geometry.

 

During the 60’s Smale reshaped the view of the world of dynamical systems. His theory of hyperbolic systems remains one of the main developments on the subject after Poincaré, and the mathematical foundations of the so-called “chaos-theory” are his work as well. In the early 60’s, Smale’s work contributed dramatically to change in the study of the topology and analysis of infinite-dimensional manifolds. This was achieved through his infinite-dimensional version of Morse’s critical point theory (known today as “Palais-Smale Theory”) and his infinite-dimensional version of Sard’s theorem.

 

In the 70’s Smale attention turned to mechanics and economics, to which he applied his ideas on topology and dynamics. For instance, his notion of “amended potential” in mechanics plays a key role in current developments in stability and bifurcation of relative equilibria. In economics, Smale applied an abstract theory of optimization for several functions, which he developed, to provide conditions for the existence of Pareto optima and to characterize this set of optima as a sub-manifold of diffeomorphic states to the set of Pareto equilibria. He also proved the existence of general equilibria under very weak assumptions and contributed to the development of algorithms for the computation of such equilibria.

 

It is this last activity that led Smale in the early 80’s to the longest segment of his career, his work on the theory of computation and computational mathematics. Against mainstream research on scientific computation, which focused on immediate solutions to concrete problems, Smale developed a theory of continuous computation and complexity (akin to that developed by computer scientists for discrete computations), and designed and analyzed algorithms for a number of specific problems. Some of these analyses constitute models for the use of deep mathematics in the study of numerical algorithms.

 

Mathematics

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Yakov Eliashberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Sir Simon K.Donaldson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean Francois le Gall

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Gregory Lawler

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Vladimir Drinfeld

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Alexander Beilinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Richard Schoen

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Charles Fefferman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

James G. Arthur

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2015

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Peter Sarnak

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2014

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Artin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

George D. Mostow

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Aschbacher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Luis Caffarelli

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Shing-Tung Yau

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Dennis Sullivan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Pierre R. Deligne

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Phillip A. Griffiths

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

David B. Mumford

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Harry Furstenberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2006/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Stephen Smale

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2006/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Gregory A. Margulis

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2005

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Sergei P. Novikov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2005

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mikio Sato

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2002/3

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John T. Tate

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2002/3

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Vladimir I. Arnold

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2001

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Saharon Shelah

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2001

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Raoul Bott

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2000

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean-Pierre Serre

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2000

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Laszlo Lovasz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1999

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Elias M. Stein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1999

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Yakov G. Sinai

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1996/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Joseph B. Keller

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1996/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Robert P. Langlands

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1995/6

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andrew J. Wiles

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1995/6

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jurgen K. Moser

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1994/5

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mikhael Gromov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1993

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jacques Tits

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1993

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lennart A. E. Carleson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1992

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John G. Thompson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1992

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Ilya Piatetski-Shapiro

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1990

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Ennio De Giorgi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1990

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John W. Milnor

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1989

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Alberto P. Calderon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1989

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lars Hormander

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathemstics 1988

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Friedrich Hirzebruch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1988

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Peter D. Lax

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1987

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Kiyoshi Ito

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1987

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Samuel Eilenberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1986

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Atle Selberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1986

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Kunihiko Kodaira

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1984/5

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hans Lewy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1984/5

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Shiing S. Chern

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1983

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Paul Erdos

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1983/4

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mark G. Krein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1982

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hassler Whitney

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1982

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Oscar Zariski

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1981

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lars V. Ahlfors

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1981

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Henry Cartan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1980

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andrei N. Kolmogorov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1980

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean Leray

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1979

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andre Weil

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1979

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Israel M. Gelfand

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1978

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Carl L. Siegel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1978

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

 

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

 

in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.

 

Professor Izrail M. Gelfand was a student of Kolmogorov, and some of his most important work was done in the 1940´s. Since the early 1950´s he has been Head of the Section of the Institute of Applied Mathematics of the USSR Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the editorial ´board of ‘Uspekhi Matematicheskikh Nauk’, chief editor of the journal ‘Functional Analysis’. From 1968-70, he was President of the Moscow Mathematical Society. He was awarded the Order of Lenin three times, and the Lenin Prize, and received many other honors and recognition such as Honorary Membership, in the American National Academy of Sciences, the American Mathematical Society, the London Mathematical Society, and many more.

 

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.