William E. Moerner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2008

The Prize Committee for Chemistry has unanimously decided that the 2008 Wolf Prize be jointly awarded to

 

William E. Moerner
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

 

“for the ingenious creation of a new field of science, single molecule spectroscopy and electrochemistry, with impact at the nanoscopic regime, from the molecular and cellular domain to complex material systems”.

 

The work of these two scientists has led to the creation of a new field of science, single-molecule spectroscopy and imaging. William E. Moerner was the first to perform optical detection and spectroscopy of a single, individual molecule in condensed matter. Allen J. Bard pioneered the development of the scanning electrochemical microscope, allowing high resolution chemical imaging of surfaces and the study of chemical reactions at the nanoscopic regime, applied to biological and catalysis systems. Prior to these discoveries, all chemical experiments essentially measured ensemble averages, over millions to billions of putatively identical copies of the sample molecule, occasionally blurring important information, pertaining to hidden heterogeneity in configuration and intermediate states, in time-domain dynamics. By pushing optical detection to the ultimate limit of one molecule, these scientists changed our understanding of the chemistry and physics of individual molecules. Thus, the strength, persistence, and daring exhibited by Moerner and Bard, in attacking seemingly insoluble problems, led to new experimental and conceptual approaches, currently widely adopted by the scientific community at large.

 

Professor William E. Moerner’s ingenious contributions to science have centered around two recurrent themes, which on one hand, address the development of a novel and revolutionary spectroscopic tool, single molecule spectroscopy; and on the other, its applications to problems in physics and analytical chemistry, biochemistry and biophysics. Since their pioneering steps in 1987, Moerner and his team have demonstrated a variety of sparking new subfields, including spectral diffusion of individual emitters, lifetime-limited line widths, temperature-induced dephasing, nonlinear saturation of a single molecule, photo-induced Poisson kinetics, blinking and switching of a single emitter, photon anti-bunching and optically-detected magnetic resonance of a single molecular spin. Thus, Moerner’s work trail-blazed a path for the measurement of individual molecules, having broad implication in the investigation of proteins, enzymes, DNA and RNA, and defects in solids or complex materials. Furthermore, this path enables the achievement of super-resolution imaging at the molecular level and endows scientists with the possibility to control the nanoscopic regime and to build molecular-scale devices.

 

Chemistry

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Stephen L. Buchwald

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John F. Hartwig

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Omar M. Yaghi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2018

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Makoto Fujita

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2018

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Robert G. Bergman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2017

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Stuart L. Schreiber

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

K. C. Nicolaou

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Chi-huey Wong

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Robert S. Langer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2013

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

A. Paul Alivisatos

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Charles M. Lieber

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Stuart A. Rice

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Krzysztof Matyjaszewski

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ching W. Tang

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

William E. Moerner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Allen J. Bard

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

George Feher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2006/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ada Yonath

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2006/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard N. Zare

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Harry B. Gray

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2004

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ryoji Noyori

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

K. Barry Sharpless

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Henri B. Kagan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

F. Albert Cotton

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2000

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Raymond U. Lemieux

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1999

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gerhard Ertl

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gabor A. Somorjai

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Samuel J. Danishefsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gilbert Stork

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard A. Lerner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1994/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Peter S. Schultz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1994/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ahmed H. Zewail

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1993

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John A. Pople

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1992

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard R. Ernst

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1991

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Alexander Pines

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1991

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Duilio Arigoni

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Alan R. Battersby

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Raphael D. Levine

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Joshua Jortner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

David C. Phillips

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

David M. Blow

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Elias J. Corey

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1986

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Albert Eschenmoser

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1986

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Rudolph A. Marcus

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1984/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John S. Waugh

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1983/4

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Herbert S. Gutowsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1983/4

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Harden M. McConnell

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1983/4

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John C. Polanyi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

George C. Pimentel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Joseph Chatt

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1981

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Henry Eyring

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1980

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Herman F. Mark

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1979

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Carl Djerassi

Wolf Prize Laurate in Chemistry 1978

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.