Chi-huey Wong

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2014

The Prize Committee for Chemistry has unanimously decided that the 2014 Wolf Prize be awarded to:

 

Prof. Chi-huey Wong
From Academia Sinica, Taiwan

 

Dr. Wong has pioneered the development of programmable chemical and enzymatic synthesis methods that enable the previously impossible or infeasible synthesis and study of classes of compounds, especially complex carbohydrates, glycoproteins and related substances, which are vitally important in biology and medicine. His enzymatic strategy coupled with cofactor regeneration elegantly fuses chemistry and biology into a novel, environmentally friendly approach to large-scale and rapid synthesis of complex carbohydrates and glycoproteins. This enzymatic method remains the most practical and efficient method available to date for large-scale synthesis of oligosaccharides. The programmable one-pot synthesis of oligosaccharides originated by his group is the first automated approach to this class of complex molecules. The original methods developed by his group have been used to solve major problems and create new opportunities in carbohydrate chemistry and biology associated with cancer progression, bacterial and viral infection and immunological function, and the work has led to the development of vaccines, therapeutics and glycan microarrays for analysis of protein-carbohydrate interaction. In addition, his fundamental study of glycoprotein folding affected by glycosylation and glycan conformation has laid the framework for much of the current interests in post-translational glycosylation, glycoprotein structural biology and drug discovery.

Chemistry

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Stephen L. Buchwald

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John F. Hartwig

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Omar M. Yaghi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2018

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Makoto Fujita

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2018

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Robert G. Bergman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2017

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Stuart L. Schreiber

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

K. C. Nicolaou

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Chi-huey Wong

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Robert S. Langer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2013

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

A. Paul Alivisatos

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Charles M. Lieber

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Stuart A. Rice

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Krzysztof Matyjaszewski

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ching W. Tang

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

William E. Moerner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Allen J. Bard

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

George Feher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2006/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ada Yonath

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2006/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard Zare

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Harry B. Gray

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2004

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ryoji Noyori

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

K. Barry Sharpless

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Henri B. Kagan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

F. Albert Cotton

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2000

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Raymond U. Lemieux

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1999

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gerhard Ertl

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gabor A. Somorjai

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Samuel J. Danishefsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gilbert Stork

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard A. Lerner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1994/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.