Trudy Mackay

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2016

The jury panel of the 2016 Wolf Prize in Agriculture has unanimously decided to award the prize to:

 

Trudy Frances Charlene Mackay

 the Department of Biological Sciences,

North Carolina State University, NC, USA

 

“For pioneering studies on the genetic architecture of complex traits and the discovery of fundamental principles of quantitative genetics with broad applications for agricultural improvements.”

 

It is now well recognized that the majority of traits of economic importance in animal and plant breeding (and traits related to most human diseases as well) are influenced by a large number of genes acting in complex regulatory networks. Trudy Mackay was among the first to realize this and throughout her career has used quantitative genetics to provide fundamental insight in the complex interplay between genes acting on complex traits as well as in understanding the interaction with the environment. Moreover, she was among the first to realize that the rapid developments in genomics allowed the integration of quantitative genetics with molecular details of genes interacting within complex regulatory networks.

 

Early in her career she already recognized the many possibilities a novel model organism like Drosophila offers towards this end. She developed a number of clever strategies like the use of transposable P-elements and high resolution mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) by complementation testing in this model species. This allowed her to uncover fundamental genetic principles studying intriguing traits like life span, behavioral responses and alcohol tolerance. Principles proven to be applicable in a wide range of species and in areas from agriculture to human genetics. More recent, recognizing the possibilities whole genome sequence data would offer, she initiated the development of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, which has proven of invaluable importance to further unravel the architecture of complex genetic traits.

 

Trudy Mackay has been a key person in building the intellectual framework for modern quantitative genetics and she has explained these principles in numerous excellent reviews and by contributing to the major textbook in the field, ‘Introduction to Quantitative Genetics’ by Falconer and Mackay. More recently she has been pioneering the concept of system genetics and enabled the first whole genome analysis using genomic selection, a fundamental tool that has revolutionized animal breeding. Combining genomic information with genomic selection is expected to further revolutionize improvement programs in animal as well as plant breeding.

Agriculture

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Caroline Dean

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2020

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

David Zilberman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2019

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Gene Robinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2018

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Trudy Mackay

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2016

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Linda J. Saif

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2015

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Leif Andersson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2014

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Jorge Dubcovsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2014

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Joachim Messing

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2013

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Jared M. Diamond

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2013

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

James R. Cook

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2011

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Harris A. Lewin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2011

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Sir David Baulcombe

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2010

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

W. Joe Lewis

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2008

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

John A. Pickett

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2008

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

James H. Tumlinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2008

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Ronald L. Phillips

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2006/7

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Michel A. J. Georges

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2006/7

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Steven D. Tanksley

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2004

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Yuan Longping

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2004

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Fuller W. Bazer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2002/3

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

R. Michael Roberts

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2002/3

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Roger N. Beachy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2001

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

James E. Womack

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2001

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Gurdev S. Khush

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2000

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Ilan Chet

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1998

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Baldur R. Stefansson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1998

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Neal L. First

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1996/7

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Morris Schnitzer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1995/6

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Frank J. Stevenson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1995/6

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Perry L. Adkisson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1994/5

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Carl B. Huffaker

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1994/5

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

John E. Casida

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1993

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Shang-Fa Yang

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1991

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Jozef S. Schell

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1990

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Peter M. Biggs

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1989

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Michael Elliott

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1989

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Ernest John Christopher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1988

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Charles Thibault

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1988

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Theodor O. Diener

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1987

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Sir Ralph Riley

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1986

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Ernest R. Sears

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1986

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Robert H. Burris

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1984/5

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Don Kirkham

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1983/4

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Cornelis T. De Wit

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1983/4

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Wendell L. Roelofs

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1982

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

John O.Almquist

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1981

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Henry A. Lardy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1981

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Glen W. Salisbury

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1981

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Karl Maramorosch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1980

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Sir Kenneth Blaxter

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1979

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

Jay L. Lush

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1979

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

John C.Walker

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1978

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.

George F.Sprague

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1978

 

The Prize Committee for Agriculture of the Wolf Foundation has unanimously chosen two scientists to share equally the Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

 

George F. Sprague
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois, USA

 

for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare.

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.
In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Professor Emeritus Walker´s eminence as a plant pathologist would lead many to judge him to be among history´s 3 or 4 greatest plant pathologists. Central to his career have been his contributions to the control of plant diseases by the development of resistant varieties of crop plants, the development of novel and effective breeding methodology, the demonstration of the role of environmental factors, particularly host nutrition and soil temperature, in the epidemiology of plant diseases, the physiological nature of diseases, and the chemical basis of disease resistance in plants.
He is, perhaps, the World´s best example of a scientist combining applied research oriented to food production and fundamental research directed to advancing the frontiers of knowledge, integrated and organized around specific problems of agriculture. Similarly, other disease control studies led to the discovery of much fundamental information regarding the role of aerial and soil environal factors in the incidence and severity of disease.
As an educator, he is without peer in the training of scientists in the profession of plant pathology. His classic text book: ‘Plant Pathology’, which has been translated into several languages, has been the standard treatise on the subject. It is today the most widely used classroom text in university schools of agriculture everywhere.