Phyllis Lambert

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2016

the Prize Committee for Architecture has unanimously decided that the 2016 Wolf Prize be awarded to:

 

Architect Phyllis Lambert

Canada

 

“For being vigorously involved in the realization of seminal innovative buildings, exemplary urban regeneration projects and leading research institutes.”

 

“Citizen Lambert” embodies the vicissitudes of the culture of architecture over 6 decades. Playing all possible roles of designer, planner, artist, writer, photographer, curator, museum director, patron and philanthropist, she ultimately stands for professional rigor and aesthetic elegance, but also for intellectual doubt and political critic. From the mid 1950’s to the present she is vigorously involved in the realization of seminal innovative buildings, exemplary urban preservation and regeneration projects and leading architectural research institutes.

 

Lambert’s first work of architecture was commissioning Ludwig Mies van der Rohe as designer of the Seagram Building in New York and herself as director of planning (1954-1958) for the project. During the 1960s she designed the Saidye Bronfman Centre in Montreal and served as consultant for the Toronto-Dominion Center project. In the 1970’s Lambert was architect-developer (with Gene Summers) for the renovation of the landmark Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles and won for this project the National Honor Award of the American Institute of Architects.

 

Lambert has been the founder, the director and the chair of the board of trustees of the Canadian Center for Architecture (completed in 1989), a notable museum and study center in Montreal. Housing extensive collections of architectural drawings, books, photographs and documents, hosting numerous scholars and curators, and initiating considerable publications and exhibitions, the CCA has established itself as both an exquisite reservoir of historical treasures and a prolific catalyst of architectural and urban discourse.

 

A persistent civic activist, Lambert was instrumental in founding the preservation group Heritage Montreal; the Investment Fund of Montreal, which revitalizes medium- and low-income housing; the Montreal Institute of Policy Alternatives; and a roundtable dedicated to renewing Montreal’s western downtown neighborhood. She has initiated a number of preservation-related projects and publications including: Court House – A photographic Document; Photography and Architecture: 1839-1939; Opening the Gates of Eighteenth-Century Montreal; and The Fortress of Babylon and the Ben Ezra Synagogue, Cairo.

Architecture

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Moshe Safdie

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2019

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Phyllis Lambert

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2016

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Eduardo Souto de Mouro

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2013

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Peter Eisenman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

David Chipperfield

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2010

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jean Nouvel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2005

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Álvaro Siza

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2001

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frei Otto

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Aldo Van Eyck

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1997/8

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Sir Denys Lasdun

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Jorn Utzon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Frank O. Gehry

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1992

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Giancarlo De Carlo

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Fumihiko Maki

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1988

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.

Ralph Erskine

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 1983/4

The Architecture Prize Committee decided that the Prize for 1983/4 be granted to:

Ralph Erskine
Drottningholm, Sweden

“for his fundamental contribution to contemporary architecture, based on his creative spirit, solving human problems in a highly original formal language.”

Ralph Erskine is a creative and original architect who, in a long career, has evolved from one of the second generation leaders of the Modern Movement, to an architect concerned in a wide range of projects with a dialogue between the existing and the new, and the participation of the users in the creation of their habitat. The rich and varied formal expression in the body of his work shows a very personal vocabulary leading to a strong and meaningful statement.