Philippa Marrack

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2015

The Prize Committee for Medicine has unanimously decided that the 2015 Wolf Prize be awarded to: Jeffrey Ravetch, John Kappler and Philippa Marrack.

 

Philippa Marrack

 National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado, USA

 

They have made major contributions to the understanding of the key antigen-specific molecules, the T cell receptor for antigen and antibodies, and how these molecules participate in immune recognition and effector function. Working together, Drs Kappler and Marrack were instrumental in documenting that the T cell receptor recognizes antigen differently from B cells, and succeeded in identifying the previously elusive T cell receptor by an ingenious use of monoclonal T cells and monoclonal antibodies. Dr Jeffrey Ravetch has studied the heterogeneous effector function of antibody molecules and has documented the importance of diverse receptors for the constant “Fc” part of antibody molecules. He cloned many of these receptors for the immunoglobulin Fc region, and showed their importance in mediating antibody function in normal and pathological states. Together this trio has contributed much to the understanding of the molecular basis of the immune response in health and disease.

Medicine

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Emmanuelle Charpentier

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2020

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided that the Prize in Medicine for 1979 shall be equally shared by Roger W. Sperry, Oleh Hornykiewicz and Arvid Carlsson.

Arvid Carlsson
Gothenburg University
Gothenburg, Sweden

“for his work which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter.”

These scientists had made outstanding contributions in brain physiology and physio-pathology.

Professor Arvid Carlsson is honored for his work, which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter. Professor at the University of Lund, Sweden until 1959, he is since then Professor of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Gothenburg; he is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and others. Dr. Carlsson received various Prizes and awards, among them the ‘Jahre’s Medical Prize in 1974. He has published almost 300 articles a considerable part of them dealing with the occurrence and functions of dopamine in brain. Dr. Carlsson’s work has had an impact on basic as well as clinical brain research.

Jennifer Doudna

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2020

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided that the Prize in Medicine for 1979 shall be equally shared by Roger W. Sperry, Oleh Hornykiewicz and Arvid Carlsson.

Arvid Carlsson
Gothenburg University
Gothenburg, Sweden

“for his work which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter.”

These scientists had made outstanding contributions in brain physiology and physio-pathology.

Professor Arvid Carlsson is honored for his work, which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter. Professor at the University of Lund, Sweden until 1959, he is since then Professor of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Gothenburg; he is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and others. Dr. Carlsson received various Prizes and awards, among them the ‘Jahre’s Medical Prize in 1974. He has published almost 300 articles a considerable part of them dealing with the occurrence and functions of dopamine in brain. Dr. Carlsson’s work has had an impact on basic as well as clinical brain research.

Jeffrey M. Friedman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided that the Prize in Medicine for 1979 shall be equally shared by Roger W. Sperry, Oleh Hornykiewicz and Arvid Carlsson.

Arvid Carlsson
Gothenburg University
Gothenburg, Sweden

“for his work which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter.”

These scientists had made outstanding contributions in brain physiology and physio-pathology.

Professor Arvid Carlsson is honored for his work, which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter. Professor at the University of Lund, Sweden until 1959, he is since then Professor of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Gothenburg; he is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and others. Dr. Carlsson received various Prizes and awards, among them the ‘Jahre’s Medical Prize in 1974. He has published almost 300 articles a considerable part of them dealing with the occurrence and functions of dopamine in brain. Dr. Carlsson’s work has had an impact on basic as well as clinical brain research.

James P. Allison

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2017

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided that the Prize in Medicine for 1979 shall be equally shared by Roger W. Sperry, Oleh Hornykiewicz and Arvid Carlsson.

Arvid Carlsson
Gothenburg University
Gothenburg, Sweden

“for his work which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter.”

These scientists had made outstanding contributions in brain physiology and physio-pathology.

Professor Arvid Carlsson is honored for his work, which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter. Professor at the University of Lund, Sweden until 1959, he is since then Professor of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Gothenburg; he is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and others. Dr. Carlsson received various Prizes and awards, among them the ‘Jahre’s Medical Prize in 1974. He has published almost 300 articles a considerable part of them dealing with the occurrence and functions of dopamine in brain. Dr. Carlsson’s work has had an impact on basic as well as clinical brain research.

Lewis Cantley

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee in Medicine has decided that the Prize in Medicine for 1979 shall be equally shared by Roger W. Sperry, Oleh Hornykiewicz and Arvid Carlsson.

Arvid Carlsson
Gothenburg University
Gothenburg, Sweden

“for his work which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter.”

These scientists had made outstanding contributions in brain physiology and physio-pathology.

Professor Arvid Carlsson is honored for his work, which established the role of dopamine as a neurotransmitter. Professor at the University of Lund, Sweden until 1959, he is since then Professor of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Gothenburg; he is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and others. Dr. Carlsson received various Prizes and awards, among them the ‘Jahre’s Med