Alex Retzker

Krill Prize 2015
Hebrew University

Alex Retzker

Research Topic:
Quantum Technologies

My current research interests are focused in the fields of quantum optics and quantum technologies. In particular, I am interested in theory which is strongly connected to experiments and I am actively pursuing collaborations with experimentalists.

This relation between theory and experiment manifests itself in dealing with theoretical schemes which help in realising quantum information objectives, like quantum processing and quantum simulation. Moreover, I am interested in applying quantum information ideas to the benefit of other areas of physics such as novel ideas for quantum sensing, to name one example. The field of quantum technologies has dramatically developed in recent years both theoretically and experimentally and the scope of quantum technology exploration has naturally extended to many areas of physics, including atomic physics, condensed-matter and quantum field theory. I have worked on several of these areas of quantum technologies, specifically, NV centres in diamond, linear ion traps, BECs, condensed matter systems and entanglement in quantum field theory. I used tools and concepts from quantum entanglement to study the structure of the vacuum state of quantum field theories, to obtain a better understanding of condensed matter properties and to design novel laser cooling schemes and quantum sensing protocols. I have always been driven by realistic experimental conditions, and this has motivated my collaborations with experimentalists. These collaborations have led to the proposal of novel schemes which many of them are now being realised by experimental teams. In the following I present briefly the current state of my research.

Quantum sensing—The ability to sense and image minute magnetic and electric fields with atomic scale resolution is one of the major challenges of modern science and technology and may have profound impact on medicine, biology, chemistry, physics and material science. The basic units of magnetic moments in nature are the dipole moments associated with the spin of nuclei and single electrons. Large part of my research is aimed at detecting these single spins at ambient conditions with the goal to revolutionise the state of the art to create novel sensing technologies that provide unprecedented access and insight into the structure and function of individual bio-molecules under physiological conditions and apply these to the observation of biological processes down to the quantum level and with atomic resolution. The proposed spin-microscopy can be used to understand and appreciate the molecular structure and dynamics of individual specimens under physiological conditions. The ability to observe single molecules overcomes a key limitation of liquid state NMR and X-Ray based structure determinationprotocols. In order to achieve this I am concentrating on the NV centre in diamond which is the most promising candidate to realise this goal. The broad challenges that this ambitious programme presents must be tackled by scientists with broad expertise and thus I am collaborating with many groups worldwide. In the past year, since I had arrived in Jerusalem, I have recruited seven research students and postdocs when four of them are working full time on this project and the other three invest part of their time on these goals. I anticipate that in the next few years a large part of my group will work on this subject. Quantum simulations—Various systems have been proposed for the realisation of a quantum computer, including trappedions, optical lattices, linear optics and solid state devices. However, despite enormous experimental progress, due to the high degree of precision that is required, the realisation of a large scale quantum computer is still not within reach. Instead, the realisation of quantum simulators which are much less demanding have recently become a target of growing interest. I have helped to drive the development of this growing field with several significant contributions. Since I came to Jerusalem, in the past year, I have had a few contributions in the field, mostly on the subjects of the study of nonlinear physics and topological defects in particular, and in the study of frustrated spin models. I have concentrated on NV centres in diamond and trappedions. Despite the fact that these are recent proposals, many of these contributions were realised and others are being currently pursued. Two members of my group are working on this subject. Robust operations — In the past two years I got interested in the field of dynamical decoupling and error correction, in particular, in the utilisation of these methods for the benefit of quantum computing and quantum sensing. In the quantum computing part I had a few contributions which had drawn a lot of interest by the ion trap and NV community. In particular the ion trap proposal was realised by the group of Dave Wineland, the last year Nobel laureate, who realised one of my proposals for a robust quantum gate and has achieved a record breaking fidelity. I believe that this novel gate scheme would be used by many other groups in the next few years. Currently, one member of my group is working on this subject.

Awards and Scholarships

// order posts by year $posts_by_year;

Yoav Shechtman

Krill Prize 2021
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Moran Shalev Ben-Ami

Krill Prize 2021
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Benyamin Rosental

Krill Prize 2021
Ben-Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ido Kaminer

Krill Prize 2021
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Tamir klein

Krill Prize 2021
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Merav Parter

Krill Prize 2021
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Guy Katz

Krill Prize 2021
The Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Naomi Habib

Krill Prize 2021
The Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Liron Barak

Krill Prize 2021
Tel-Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Joshua Baraban

Krill Prize 2021
Ben-Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Karam Natour

Kiefer Prize Laureate– 2020

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Schraga Schwartz

Krill Prize 2020
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Kfir Blum

Krill Prize 2020
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Tomer Michaeli

Krill Prize 2020
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yuval Filmus

Krill Prize 2020
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Meirav Zehavi

Krill Prize 2020
Ben Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Idan Hod

Krill Prize 2020
Ben Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Adam Teman

Krill Prize 2020
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yasmine Meroz

Krill Prize 2020
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yakir Hadad

Krill Prize 2020
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yonit Hochberg

Krill Prize 2020
Hebrew Univ.

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Neta Regev-Rudzki

Krill Prize 2019
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ofer Firstenberg

Krill Prize 2019
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Amnon Bar-Shir

Krill Prize 2019
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Shahar Kvatinsky

Krill Prize 2019
Technion Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yaron Fuchs

Krill Prize 2019
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Baruch Barzel

Krill Prize 2019
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Malachi Noked

Krill Prize 2019
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Noga Ron-Zewi

Krill Prize 2019
Haifa University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Dafna Shahaf

Krill Prize 2019
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ori Katz

Krill Prize 2019
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Itzhak Tamo

Krill Prize 2018
Tel-Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Amit Sever

Krill Prize 2018
Tel-Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Meital Landau

Krill Prize 2018
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Charles E. Diesendruck

Krill Prize 2018
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yakov Babichenko

Krill Prize 2018
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ayelet Erez

Krill Prize 2018
Weismann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Adi Salomon

Krill Prize 2018
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Elad Gross

Krill Prize 2018
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Emmanuel Levy

Krill Prize 2018
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Anat Milo

Krill Prize 2018
Ben-Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Avi Shroeder

Krill Prize 2017
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Carmel Rotchild

Krill Prize 2017
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Shiri Chechik

Krill Prize 2017
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yonatan Dubi

Krill Prize 2017
Ben Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yoav Goldberg

Krill Prize 2017
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Zvika Brakerski

Krill Prize 2017
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Asya Rolls

Krill Prize 2017
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Nir Bar-Gill

Krill Prize 2017
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yossi Buganim

Krill Prize 2017
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yael Frank

Winner of Kiefer Scholarship in – 2017

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Eilon Shani

Krill Prize 2017
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Keren Censor-Hillel

Krill Prize 2016
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Netanel Lindner

Krill Prize 2016
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Maya Bar Sadan

Krill Prize 2016
Ben Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Jakub Abramson

Krill Prize 2016
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Itay Halevy

Krill Prize 2016
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yossi Yovel

Krill Prize 2016
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Daniel Deutch

Krill Prize 2016
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Assaf Rinot 

Krill Prize 2016
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Lioz Etgar

Krill Prize 2016
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Dana Reichmann

Krill Prize 2016
Hebrew Univ.

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Eran Ofek

Krill Prize 2015
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ido Amit 

Krill Prize 2015
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Barak Dayan

Krill Prize 2015
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Natalie Elia Herooty

Krill Prize 2015
Ben Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Oded Rechavi

Krill Prize 2015
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Alex Retzker

Krill Prize 2015
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Michael Schapira

Krill Prize 2015
Hebrew Univ.

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Sharon Ruthstein

Krill Prize 2015
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Uri Shapira

Krill Prize 2015
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Moran Bercovici

Krill Prize 2015
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Naama Arad

Winner of Kiefer Scholarship 2015

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Or Dunkelman

Krill Prize 2014
Haifa University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Irit Gat-Viks

Krill Prize 2014
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Lilach Gilboa

Krill Prize 2014
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Eran Bouchbinder

Krill Prize 2014
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Shahal Ilani

Krill Prize 2014
Weizman Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Roie Yerushalmi

Krill Prize 2014
Hebrew Univ.

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Daniel Podolsky

Krill Prize 2014
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Amir Yehudayoff

Krill Prize 2014
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Nathan Keller

Krill Prize 2014
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Niv Papo

Krill Prize 2014
Ben Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

David Nicolas Waldmann

Krill Prize 2013
University of Haifa

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Tomer Volansky

Krill Prize 2013
Tel-Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Nirit Dudovich

Krill Prize 2013
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Anat Levin

Krill Prize 2013
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Sagiv Shifman

Krill Prize 2013
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Itai Ynai

Krill Prize 2013
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Amit Kanigel

Krill Prize 2013
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Avinoam Zadok

Krill Prize 2013
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Jacob Hanna

Krill Prize 2013
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Jacob (kobi) Gal

Krill Prize 2013
Ben Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Tamar Harpaz

Winner of Kiefer Scholarship 2013

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yoel Shkolnisky

Krill Prize 2012
Tel- Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Alex Bronstein

Krill Prize 2012
Tel – Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Erez Levanon

Krill Prize 2012
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Amos Tanay

Krill Prize 2012
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Nachum Ulanovsky

Krill Prize 2012
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ido Branslavsky

Krill Prize 2012
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Gil Alexandrowicz

Krill Prize 2012
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Louisa Meshi

Krill Prize 2012
Ben-Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Amir Amedi

Krill Prize 2011
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Avishay Gal-Yam

Krill Prize 2011
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Shai Meiri

Krill Prize 2011
Tel Aviv University 

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Taleb Mokari

Krill Prize 2011
Ben-Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Reuven Cohen

Krill Prize 2011
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Oren Cohen

Krill Prize 2011
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yuval Shaked

Krill Prize 2011
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Gilad Ratman

Winner of Kiefer Scholarship 2011

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ehud Altman

Krill Prize 2010
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Kinneret Keren

Krill Prize 2010
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Anne Bernheim

Krill Prize 2010
Ben-Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Dan Thomas Major

Krill Prize 2010
Bar Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Eran Halperin

Krill Prize 2010
Tel-Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Masha Niv

Krill Prize 2010
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Julia Kempe

Krill Prize 2009
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Nathalie Questembert-Balaban

Krill Prize 2009
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ilan Koren

Krill Prize 2009
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Boaz Tsaban

Krill Prize 2009
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Debbie Lindell

Krill Prize 2009
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Eli C. Lewis

Krill Prize 2009
Ben-Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ruti Sela

Winner of Kiefer Scholarship 2009

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Shiri Artstein-Avidan

Krill Prize 2008
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Ido Dagan

Krill Prize 2008
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Roy Bar-Ziv

Krill Prize 2008
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Eli Berger

Krill Prize 2008
University of Haifa

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Yuval Dor

Krill Prize 2008
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Jeff Steinhauer

Krill Prize 2008
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Zeev Zalevsky

Krill Prize 2007
Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Tal Alexander

Krill Prize 2007
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Roded Sharan

Krill Prize 2007
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Dr. Yoav Tsori

Krill Prize 2007
Ben-Gurion University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Oren Froy

Krill Prize 2007
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Amir Orian

Krill Prize 2007
Technion

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Barak Ravitz

Winner of Kiefer Scholarship 2007

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Leeor Kronik

Krill Prize 2006
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Tal Pupko

Krill Prize 2006
Tel Aviv University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid hormone response at tissue and subcellular levels? 4) Do subcellularly localized hormone transporters affect the hormone response and what is subcellular hormone map?
The major goal of the lab goals is to investigate the robust and specialized functions of plant hormone transporter families. In our lab we will are using multiple-targeted artificial microRNAs and CRISPR technology to establish Arabidopsis and tomato populations, respectively, deficient in multiple redundant hormone transporters. First stage, we generated a unique targeted forward genetic approach that bypasses functional redundancy in plants with a dynamic screening range. This allows us to first target the NPF and ABC families in Arabidopsis and tomato. At a second stage, we are using targeted high-throughput screens to identify developmental redundant phenotypes. These loss-of-function phenotypes combined with hormone-mediated physiological assays, analyses of transporter expression patterns and localization, and biochemical transport assays allows us to study NPF and ABC hormone transport mechanisms, identify missing exporters, and evaluate subcellular localization of hormone transporters. Our work in the past three years has identified novel putative GA, CK, IAA and ABA hormone transporters, including CRISPR application in tomato that recovered striking GA-mediated growth defects when six novel GA transporters were knocked out in tomato, thus emphasizing the outstanding strength of our screens. Having the novel CRISPR multiple-targeted platform at our disposal is a significant achievement, since it not only contribute to our understanding of hormone transport mechanisms but will also serve as a scientific breakthrough to overcome functional redundancy in all fields of plant biology and agricultural breeding.
In addition, there is growing amount of evidence suggesting that hormone transporters localized on intracellular compartments actively regulate the subcellular distributions of hormones and hormone intermediate (J 8-20). One of the labs aims is to obtain a deeper understanding of hormones distribution in snbcellular resolution, and address the question of quantitative endogenous hormone levels in different compartments. To profile cellular hormone metabolites within discrete organelles, we are using an innovative strategy to isolate distinct cellular compartments and reveal the complete profiles of active hormone and hormone precursors and conjugates in organelles. This approach will generate the first subcellular hormone localization map and will enable the quantification and characterization of the in vivo activities of known and unidentified subcellular hormone transporters. We believe that our studies will lead to a fuller understanding of hormone transporter functions and specialized subcellular activities.

Itamar Simon

Krill Prize 2006
Hebrew University

Dr. Eilon Shani 
Scientific Overview:
Plant growth and development is mediated to a large extent by hormones. Plants regulate hormone response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, perception, and signaling (1-3). In addition, plants exhibit the unique ability to spatially regulate hormone distribution ( 4, 5). This ability is illustrated most clearly in the case of auxin (!AA). The combined activity of auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins generates auxin maxima and local gradients that inform developmental patterning. The regulation of the cellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux transporters determines the direction of auxin flow from one cell to another ( 6, 7). Until recently, little was known about the transport mechanisms and the distribution patterns of hormones other than auxin. These are exciting days for the plant hormone community as novel gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinin (CK) transporters have recently been identified (8-14) joining earlier findings on auxin transporters (15, 16), all are members ofNPF, ABC, or PUP families. My research group and others identified the NPFs as the first GA transporter in plants 14• Although our studies suggest that individual NPF and ABC genes have specialized functions, genetic analyses of the family have been limited by the scarcity of loss-of-function phenotypes. The major reason for this is that plant genomes are highly redundant. There are huge numbers of genes encoding NPF and ABC transporters (53 and 120, respectively, in Arabidopsis) that exhibit high redundancy despite diverse substrate specificity of the encoded proteins. This redundancy, with over 80% of all protein-coding genes belonging to families, illustrates the huge challenge to the field of plant genetics in general and to the study of hormone transport specifically. On top of that, certain transporters, such as some NPFs, can transport multiple hormone substrates (GA, ABA) generating a highly robust system that is unique and interesting but puzzling (J 2, 14, 17). Furthermore, transporters with high specificity for conjugated hormones, which must balance the subcellular active hormone pools, have not been identified.
We plan to address the burning questions that emerge from this recent progress in the field, all of which are challenging due to the functional redundancy of plant hormone transporters: 1) Do closely related NPF and ABC members transport multiple substrates and what is the biological importance of such activity? 2) Why have GA exporters, which must exist to enable the movement of the hormone, not been identified? 3) Are there specialized hormone transporters for conjugated hormones and what is their contribution to the rapid