Yakov Eliashberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The 2020 Wolf Prize in Mathematics is awarded jointly to Yakov Eliashberg and Simon Donaldson.

 

professor Yakov Eliashberg

Stanford University, USA

 

“for their contributions to differential geometry and topology.”

 

Yakov Eliashberg is one of the founders of symplectic and contact topology, a discipline originated as mathematical language for qualitative problems of classical mechanics, and having deep connections with modern physics. The emergence of symplectic and contact topology has been one of the most striking long-term advances in mathematical research over the past four decades. Eliashberg is among the main exponents of this development.

 

Professor Eliashberg was born in 1946 in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg), Russia. He received his doctoral degree in Leningrad University in 1972 under the direction of V.A. Rokhlin, and in the same year he joined Syktyvkar University in northern Soviet Union. Eliashberg’s route passed through the refusenik years in Leningrad (1980-1987) where he had to do software engineering in order to feed his family, and where he was virtually cut off from normal mathematical life. In 1988 he emigrated to the United States and in 1989 became a Professor at Stanford University. He is a Member of U.S. National Academy of Sciences. For his contributions, Eliashberg has received a number of prestigious awards, including the Guggenheim Fellowship in 1995, the Oswald Veblen Prize in 2001, the Heinz Hopf Prize in 2013 and the Crafoord Prize in 2016. Eliashberg is currently the Herald L. and Caroline L. Ritch Professor at Stanford University.

 

In the 1980-ies Eliashberg developed a highly ingenious and very visual combinatorial technique that led him to the first manifestation of symplectic rigidity: the group of symplectomorphisms is closed in the group of all diffeomorphisms in the uniform topology. This fundamental result, proved in a different way also by Gromov and called nowadays the Eliashberg-Gromov theorem, is considered as one of the wonders and cornerstones of symplectic topology. In a series of papers (1989-1992), Eliashberg introduced and explored a fundamental dichotomy “tight vs overtwisted” contact structure that shaped the face of modern contact topology. Using this dichotomy, he gave the complete classification of contact structures on

 

the 3-sphere (1992). In these papers Eliashberg laid foundations of modern contact topology and introduced mathematical language which is widely used by researchers in this rapidly developing field.

 

In a seminal 2000 paper Eliashberg (with Givental and Hofer) pioneered foundations of symplectic field theory, a powerful, rich and notoriously sophisticated algebraic structure behind Gromov’s pseudo-holomorphic curves.  It had a huge impact and became one of the most central and exciting directions in symplectic and contact topology. It have led to a significant progress on numerous areas including topology of Lagrangian submanifolds and geometry and dynamics of contact transformations, and it exhibited surprising links with classical and quantum integrable systems.

 

In recent years (2013-2015), Eliashberg found a number of astonishing appearances of homotopy principle in symplectic and contact topology leading him to a solution of a number of outstanding open problems and leading to a “mentality shift” in the field. Before these developments the consensus among experts was that the symplectic world is governed by rigidity coming from Gromov’s theory of pseudo-holomorphic curves or, equivalently, by Morse theory on the loop spaces of symplectic manifolds. The current impression based on Eliashberg’s discoveries is that rigidity is just a drop in the ocean of flexible phenomena.

 

Professor Yakov Eliashberg is awarded the Wolf Prize for his foundational work on symplectic and contact topology changing the face of these fields, and for his ground-breaking contribution to homotopy principles for partial differential relations and to topological foundations of multi-dimensional complex analysis.

 

Mathematics

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Yakov Eliashberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Simon K. Donaldson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2020

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean Francois le Gall

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Gregory Lawler

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2019

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Vladimir Drinfeld

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Alexander Beilinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2018

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Richard Schoen

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Charles Fefferman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2017

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

James G. Arthur

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2015

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Peter Sarnak

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2014

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Artin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

George D. Mostow

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2013

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Michael Aschbacher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Luis Caffarelli

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2012

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Shing-Tung Yau

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Dennis Sullivan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2010

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Pierre R. Deligne

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Phillip A. Griffiths

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

David B. Mumford

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2008

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hillel (Harry) Furstenberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2006/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Stephen Smale

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2006/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Gregory Margulis

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2005

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Sergei Novikov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2005

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mikio Sato

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2002/3

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John Tate

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2002/3

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Vladimir Arnold

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2001

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Saharon Shelah

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2001

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Raoul Bott

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2000

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean-Pierre Serre

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 2000

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Laszlo Lovasz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1999

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Elias M. Stein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1999

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Yakov G. Sinai

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1996/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Joseph B. Keller

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1996/7

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Robert P. Langlands

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1995/6

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andrew J. Wiles

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1995/6

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jurgen K. Moser

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1994/5

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mikhael Gromov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1993

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jacques Tits

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1993

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lennart A. E. Carleson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1992

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John G. Thompson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1992

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Ilya Piatetski-Shapiro

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1990

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Ennio De Giorgi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1990

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

John W. Milnor

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1989

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Alberto P. Calderon

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1989

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lars Hörmander

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathemstics 1988

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Friedrich Hirzebruch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1988

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Peter D. Lax

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1987

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Kiyoshi Ito

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1987

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Samuel Eilenberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1986

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Atle Selberg

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1986

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Kunihiko Kodaira

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1984/5

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hans Lewy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1984/5

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Shiing-Shen Chern

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1983

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Paul Erdos

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1983/4

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Mark G. Krein

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1982

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Hassler Whitney

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1982

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Oscar Zariski

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1981

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Lars V. Ahlfors

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1981

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Henri cartan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1980

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Andrey N. Kolmogorov

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1980

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Jean Leray

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1979

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

André Weil

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1979

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Israel M. Gelfand

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1978

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.

Carl L. Siegel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Mathematics 1978

The Prize Committee in Mathematics has carefully considered all candidates and has reached a unanimous conclusion that the Wolf Prize in Mathematics this year should be jointly awarded to Israel M. Gelfand and Carl L. Siegel.

Carl L. Siegel
University of Gottingen
Goettingen, Germany

“in recognition of his contributions to the theory of numbers, theory of several complex variables, and celestial mechanics.”

Professor Carl L. Siegel received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Gottingen, 1920; became Professor of Mathematics at the University of Frankfurt-am-Main, 1922, and later at the University of Gottingen. Many of his important contributions to the theory of numbers and several complex variables date to this period in Gottingen. Being an outspoken anti-Nazi, he fled Germany in 1940 to Denmark, and was at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, from 1940 to 1950 at which time he returned to Gottingen.