Benjamin F. Cravatt III

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2022

The 2022 Wolf Prize in Chemistry

is awarded to Professors Bassler, Bertozzi, and Cravatt

“for their seminal contributions to understanding the chemistry of cellular
communication and inventing chemical methodologies to study the role of
carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in such biological processes”.

 

Cravatt, the Gilula Chair of Chemical Biology and Professor in the Department of Chemistry at The Scripps Research Institute. His research aims to understand proteins’ roles in human physiological and pathological processes and use this knowledge to identify novel therapeutic targets and drugs to treat diseases.

Cravatt was inspired to think about biology by his parents and credits his high school mathematics teachers for nurturing his interest in the quantitative sciences. Cravatt obtained his undergraduate education at Stanford University, receiving a B.Sc in Biology and a B.A. in History. He then received a Ph.D. from The Scripps Research
Institute (TSRI) in 1996 and joined the faculty at TSRI in 1997.

Bridging the fields of chemistry and biology, Cravatt and his research group have developed and applied technologies to discover biochemical pathways in mammalian biology and disease. Cravatt pioneered an approach to identify protein classes based on their activity. His multidisciplinary approach generates all tools and models required to assign molecular, cellular, and physiological functions to enzymes and, as an essential corollary, assess their suitability as therapeutic targets. He achieves a unique balance that cultivates the creation and rapid implementation of cutting-edge technologies to advance basic and translational science.

Cravatt’s work on the endocannabinoid system has radically changed the landscape of proteome analysis by demonstrating how innovative chemical methods can be used to broadly and deeply investigate protein function directly in native biological systems.

The chemical proteomic technology Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP), pioneered by Cravatt employs chemical probes to directly measure enzyme function. For example, a fluorescent label may be used to tag enzymes with certain chemical properties, allowing scientists to survey all active enzymes in a cell at once, and to determine
the targets of drugs in a global manner directly in living systems.

Cravatt has used this and related chemical proteomic technologies to conduct global analyses of protein activities and to elucidate the functions of several enzymes, including those linked to human cancers, neurological disorders, and the endocannabinoid system, which consists of lipid transmitters involved in appetite regulation, pain sensation, mood, memory, and other physiological processes.

“Benjamin Cravatt is awarded the Wolf prize for developing activity-based protein profiling, which has emerged as a powerful and widely used chemical proteomic strategy to characterize enzyme function in native biological systems. He used this approach to characterize numerous enzymes which play critical roles in human biology and disease, including the endocannabinoid hydrolases whose lipid products regulate communication between cells.”

Chemistry

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Benjamin F. Cravatt III

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2022

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Carolyn R. Bertozzi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2022

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Bonnie L. Bassler

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2022

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Leslie Leiserowitz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2021

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Meir Lahav

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2021

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Stephen L. Buchwald

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John F. Hartwig

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2019

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Omar M. Yaghi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2018

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Makoto Fujita

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2018

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Robert G. Bergman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2017

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Stuart L. Schreiber

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

K. C. Nicolaou

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2016

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Chi-huey Wong

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2014

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Robert S. Langer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2013

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

A. Paul Alivisatos

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Charles M. Lieber

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2012

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Stuart A. Rice

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Krzysztof Matyjaszewski

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ching W. Tang

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2011

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

William E. Moerner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Allen J. Bard

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2008

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

George Feher

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2006/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ada Yonath

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2006/7

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard Zare

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2005

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Harry B. Gray

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2004

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ryoji Noyori

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

K. Barry Sharpless

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Henri B. Kagan

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2001

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

F. Albert Cotton

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2000

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Raymond U. Lemieux

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1999

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gerhard Ertl

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gabor A. Somorjai

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1998

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Samuel J. Danishefsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Gilbert Stork

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1995/6

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard A. Lerner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1994/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Peter S. Schultz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1994/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Ahmed H. Zewail

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1993

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John A. Pople

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1992

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Richard R. Ernst

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1991

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Alexander Pines

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1991

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Duilio Arigoni

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Alan R. Battersby

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1989

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Raphael D. Levine

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Joshua Jortner

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1988

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

David C. Phillips

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

David M. Blow

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1987

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Elias J. Corey

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1986

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Albert Eschenmoser

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1986

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Rudolph A. Marcus

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1984/5

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John S. Waugh

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1983/4

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Herbert S. Gutowsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1983/4

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Harden M. McConnell

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1983/4

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

John C. Polanyi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

George C. Pimentel

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1982

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Joseph Chatt

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1981

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Henry Eyring

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1980

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Herman F. Mark

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 1979

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.

Carl Djerassi

Wolf Prize Laurate in Chemistry 1978

The Wolf Foundation Prize Committee for Chemistry for 1978 has unanimously selected:

Carl Djerassi
Stanford University
Stanford, California, USA

“for his work in bioorganic chemistry, application of new spectroscopic techniques, and his support of international cooperation.”

Professsor Carl Djerassi’s work has had a unique impact on science, technology, and the betterment of mankind. He synthesized the first oral contraceptive, 19-norethindrone, which is the active ingredient in more than half of all oral contraceptives, the most widely used form of birth control in the world. His scientific work has been reported in over 800 published articles and books on synthetic organic chemistry. He has pioneered the use of various physical tools for the elucidation of the structure of organic molecules. He has been effective in translating scientific knowledge into technological practice. He has been responsible for important international scientific cooperative efforts between the United States Mexico, Brazil, Zaire, Kenya, and other countries, involving the creation of new research groups and institutions in chemistry and other fields of science and technology.

He is chairman of the United States National Academy of Science´s Board on Science and Technology in International Development and has been the driving force in recent Pugwash Conferences on the search for solutions to the world´s population growth problems. For all these contributions to science, to industry, and to humanity, Carl Djerassi is awarded the first Wolf Foundation Prize for Chemistry.