The Wolf Prize laureates

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Olga Neuwirth

Wolf Prize Laureate in Music 2021

The 2021 wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to:

Professor Joan Steitz

Sterling Professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz, Lynne Maquat and Adrian Krainer for fundamental discoveries in RNA biology that have the potential to better human lives. They have made ground-breaking discoveries in RNA regulatory mechanisms demonstrating that RNA is not a passive template between DNA and protein, but rather plays a dominant role in regulating and diversifying gene expression.

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz for ground-breaking discoveries on RNA processing and its function.

Our DNA carries the instructions to manufacture all the proteins needed by a cell. After each gene is copied from DNA into RNA, the RNA message is “spliced” – a process involving precise cutting and pasting. Steitz has studied RNA since the 1960s and was the first to describe the translation initiation sites of prokaryotic RNA in 1969. She turned her attention to eukaryotic cells, focusing on why eukaryotic cells produce an excess of RNA in the nucleus that is not found in cytoplasm in the form of mRNA. Steitz demonstrated that ribosomes use complementary base pairing to start translating mRNA. She discovered snRNPs )small nuclear ribonucleoproteins(- small non-coding RNAs that are crucial for splicing of mRNA. Teaching and mentoring young scientists and advocating for women in science has also been a hallmark of Steitz’s career. Joan Steitz is awarded the Wolf Prize for her many fundamental contributions to the field of RNA biology. In particular, she discovered the critical roles of small non-coding RNAs in the splicing of pre-mRNAs and the biogenesis of ribosomal RNA, and elucidated biochemical mechanisms that regulate RNA stability in eukaryotic cells. Her pioneering discoveries have laid the foundations to much of the subsequent research on RNA splicing.  

Stevie Wonder

Wolf Prize Laureate in Music 2021

The 2021 wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to:

Professor Joan Steitz

Sterling Professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz, Lynne Maquat and Adrian Krainer for fundamental discoveries in RNA biology that have the potential to better human lives. They have made ground-breaking discoveries in RNA regulatory mechanisms demonstrating that RNA is not a passive template between DNA and protein, but rather plays a dominant role in regulating and diversifying gene expression.

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz for ground-breaking discoveries on RNA processing and its function.

Our DNA carries the instructions to manufacture all the proteins needed by a cell. After each gene is copied from DNA into RNA, the RNA message is “spliced” – a process involving precise cutting and pasting. Steitz has studied RNA since the 1960s and was the first to describe the translation initiation sites of prokaryotic RNA in 1969. She turned her attention to eukaryotic cells, focusing on why eukaryotic cells produce an excess of RNA in the nucleus that is not found in cytoplasm in the form of mRNA. Steitz demonstrated that ribosomes use complementary base pairing to start translating mRNA. She discovered snRNPs )small nuclear ribonucleoproteins(- small non-coding RNAs that are crucial for splicing of mRNA. Teaching and mentoring young scientists and advocating for women in science has also been a hallmark of Steitz’s career. Joan Steitz is awarded the Wolf Prize for her many fundamental contributions to the field of RNA biology. In particular, she discovered the critical roles of small non-coding RNAs in the splicing of pre-mRNAs and the biogenesis of ribosomal RNA, and elucidated biochemical mechanisms that regulate RNA stability in eukaryotic cells. Her pioneering discoveries have laid the foundations to much of the subsequent research on RNA splicing.  

Leslie Leiserowitz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2021

The 2021 wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to:

Professor Joan Steitz

Sterling Professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz, Lynne Maquat and Adrian Krainer for fundamental discoveries in RNA biology that have the potential to better human lives. They have made ground-breaking discoveries in RNA regulatory mechanisms demonstrating that RNA is not a passive template between DNA and protein, but rather plays a dominant role in regulating and diversifying gene expression.

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz for ground-breaking discoveries on RNA processing and its function.

Our DNA carries the instructions to manufacture all the proteins needed by a cell. After each gene is copied from DNA into RNA, the RNA message is “spliced” – a process involving precise cutting and pasting. Steitz has studied RNA since the 1960s and was the first to describe the translation initiation sites of prokaryotic RNA in 1969. She turned her attention to eukaryotic cells, focusing on why eukaryotic cells produce an excess of RNA in the nucleus that is not found in cytoplasm in the form of mRNA. Steitz demonstrated that ribosomes use complementary base pairing to start translating mRNA. She discovered snRNPs )small nuclear ribonucleoproteins(- small non-coding RNAs that are crucial for splicing of mRNA. Teaching and mentoring young scientists and advocating for women in science has also been a hallmark of Steitz’s career. Joan Steitz is awarded the Wolf Prize for her many fundamental contributions to the field of RNA biology. In particular, she discovered the critical roles of small non-coding RNAs in the splicing of pre-mRNAs and the biogenesis of ribosomal RNA, and elucidated biochemical mechanisms that regulate RNA stability in eukaryotic cells. Her pioneering discoveries have laid the foundations to much of the subsequent research on RNA splicing.  

Meir Lahav

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2021

The 2021 wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to:

Professor Joan Steitz

Sterling Professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz, Lynne Maquat and Adrian Krainer for fundamental discoveries in RNA biology that have the potential to better human lives. They have made ground-breaking discoveries in RNA regulatory mechanisms demonstrating that RNA is not a passive template between DNA and protein, but rather plays a dominant role in regulating and diversifying gene expression.

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz for ground-breaking discoveries on RNA processing and its function.

Our DNA carries the instructions to manufacture all the proteins needed by a cell. After each gene is copied from DNA into RNA, the RNA message is “spliced” – a process involving precise cutting and pasting. Steitz has studied RNA since the 1960s and was the first to describe the translation initiation sites of prokaryotic RNA in 1969. She turned her attention to eukaryotic cells, focusing on why eukaryotic cells produce an excess of RNA in the nucleus that is not found in cytoplasm in the form of mRNA. Steitz demonstrated that ribosomes use complementary base pairing to start translating mRNA. She discovered snRNPs )small nuclear ribonucleoproteins(- small non-coding RNAs that are crucial for splicing of mRNA. Teaching and mentoring young scientists and advocating for women in science has also been a hallmark of Steitz’s career. Joan Steitz is awarded the Wolf Prize for her many fundamental contributions to the field of RNA biology. In particular, she discovered the critical roles of small non-coding RNAs in the splicing of pre-mRNAs and the biogenesis of ribosomal RNA, and elucidated biochemical mechanisms that regulate RNA stability in eukaryotic cells. Her pioneering discoveries have laid the foundations to much of the subsequent research on RNA splicing.  

Giorgio Parisi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Physics 2021

The 2021 wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to:

Professor Joan Steitz

Sterling Professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz, Lynne Maquat and Adrian Krainer for fundamental discoveries in RNA biology that have the potential to better human lives. They have made ground-breaking discoveries in RNA regulatory mechanisms demonstrating that RNA is not a passive template between DNA and protein, but rather plays a dominant role in regulating and diversifying gene expression.

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz for ground-breaking discoveries on RNA processing and its function.

Our DNA carries the instructions to manufacture all the proteins needed by a cell. After each gene is copied from DNA into RNA, the RNA message is “spliced” – a process involving precise cutting and pasting. Steitz has studied RNA since the 1960s and was the first to describe the translation initiation sites of prokaryotic RNA in 1969. She turned her attention to eukaryotic cells, focusing on why eukaryotic cells produce an excess of RNA in the nucleus that is not found in cytoplasm in the form of mRNA. Steitz demonstrated that ribosomes use complementary base pairing to start translating mRNA. She discovered snRNPs )small nuclear ribonucleoproteins(- small non-coding RNAs that are crucial for splicing of mRNA. Teaching and mentoring young scientists and advocating for women in science has also been a hallmark of Steitz’s career. Joan Steitz is awarded the Wolf Prize for her many fundamental contributions to the field of RNA biology. In particular, she discovered the critical roles of small non-coding RNAs in the splicing of pre-mRNAs and the biogenesis of ribosomal RNA, and elucidated biochemical mechanisms that regulate RNA stability in eukaryotic cells. Her pioneering discoveries have laid the foundations to much of the subsequent research on RNA splicing.  

Adrian Krainer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2021

The 2021 wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to:

Professor Joan Steitz

Sterling Professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz, Lynne Maquat and Adrian Krainer for fundamental discoveries in RNA biology that have the potential to better human lives. They have made ground-breaking discoveries in RNA regulatory mechanisms demonstrating that RNA is not a passive template between DNA and protein, but rather plays a dominant role in regulating and diversifying gene expression.

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz for ground-breaking discoveries on RNA processing and its function.

Our DNA carries the instructions to manufacture all the proteins needed by a cell. After each gene is copied from DNA into RNA, the RNA message is “spliced” – a process involving precise cutting and pasting. Steitz has studied RNA since the 1960s and was the first to describe the translation initiation sites of prokaryotic RNA in 1969. She turned her attention to eukaryotic cells, focusing on why eukaryotic cells produce an excess of RNA in the nucleus that is not found in cytoplasm in the form of mRNA. Steitz demonstrated that ribosomes use complementary base pairing to start translating mRNA. She discovered snRNPs )small nuclear ribonucleoproteins(- small non-coding RNAs that are crucial for splicing of mRNA. Teaching and mentoring young scientists and advocating for women in science has also been a hallmark of Steitz’s career. Joan Steitz is awarded the Wolf Prize for her many fundamental contributions to the field of RNA biology. In particular, she discovered the critical roles of small non-coding RNAs in the splicing of pre-mRNAs and the biogenesis of ribosomal RNA, and elucidated biochemical mechanisms that regulate RNA stability in eukaryotic cells. Her pioneering discoveries have laid the foundations to much of the subsequent research on RNA splicing.  

Lynne Elizabeth Maquat

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2021

The 2021 wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to:

Professor Joan Steitz

Sterling Professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz, Lynne Maquat and Adrian Krainer for fundamental discoveries in RNA biology that have the potential to better human lives. They have made ground-breaking discoveries in RNA regulatory mechanisms demonstrating that RNA is not a passive template between DNA and protein, but rather plays a dominant role in regulating and diversifying gene expression.

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz for ground-breaking discoveries on RNA processing and its function.

Our DNA carries the instructions to manufacture all the proteins needed by a cell. After each gene is copied from DNA into RNA, the RNA message is “spliced” – a process involving precise cutting and pasting. Steitz has studied RNA since the 1960s and was the first to describe the translation initiation sites of prokaryotic RNA in 1969. She turned her attention to eukaryotic cells, focusing on why eukaryotic cells produce an excess of RNA in the nucleus that is not found in cytoplasm in the form of mRNA. Steitz demonstrated that ribosomes use complementary base pairing to start translating mRNA. She discovered snRNPs )small nuclear ribonucleoproteins(- small non-coding RNAs that are crucial for splicing of mRNA. Teaching and mentoring young scientists and advocating for women in science has also been a hallmark of Steitz’s career. Joan Steitz is awarded the Wolf Prize for her many fundamental contributions to the field of RNA biology. In particular, she discovered the critical roles of small non-coding RNAs in the splicing of pre-mRNAs and the biogenesis of ribosomal RNA, and elucidated biochemical mechanisms that regulate RNA stability in eukaryotic cells. Her pioneering discoveries have laid the foundations to much of the subsequent research on RNA splicing.  

Joan Steitz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Medicine 2021

The 2021 wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to:

Professor Joan Steitz

Sterling Professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz, Lynne Maquat and Adrian Krainer for fundamental discoveries in RNA biology that have the potential to better human lives. They have made ground-breaking discoveries in RNA regulatory mechanisms demonstrating that RNA is not a passive template between DNA and protein, but rather plays a dominant role in regulating and diversifying gene expression.

The 2021 Wolf prize in Medicine is awarded to Joan Steitz for ground-breaking discoveries on RNA processing and its function.

Our DNA carries the instructions to manufacture all the proteins needed by a cell. After each gene is copied from DNA into RNA, the RNA message is “spliced” – a process involving precise cutting and pasting. Steitz has studied RNA since the 1960s and was the first to describe the translation initiation sites of prokaryotic RNA in 1969. She turned her attention to eukaryotic cells, focusing on why eukaryotic cells produce an excess of RNA in the nucleus that is not found in cytoplasm in the form of mRNA. Steitz demonstrated that ribosomes use complementary base pairing to start translating mRNA. She discovered snRNPs )small nuclear ribonucleoproteins(- small non-coding RNAs that are crucial for splicing of mRNA. Teaching and mentoring young scientists and advocating for women in science has also been a hallmark of Steitz’s career. Joan Steitz is awarded the Wolf Prize for her many fundamental contributions to the field of RNA biology. In particular, she discovered the critical roles of small non-coding RNAs in the splicing of pre-mRNAs and the biogenesis of ribosomal RNA, and elucidated biochemical mechanisms that regulate RNA stability in eukaryotic cells. Her pioneering discoveries have laid the foundations to much of the subsequent research on RNA splicing.  

Prizes and scholarships laureates

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Yoav Shechtman

Krill Prize 2021
Technion

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Moran Shalev Ben-Ami

Krill Prize 2021
Weizmann Institute

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Benyamin Rosental

Krill Prize 2021
Ben-Gurion University

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Ido Kaminer

Krill Prize 2021
Technion

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Tamir klein

Krill Prize 2021
Weizmann Institute

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Merav Parter

Krill Prize 2021
Weizmann Institute

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Guy Katz

Krill Prize 2021
The Hebrew University

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Naomi Habib

Krill Prize 2021
The Hebrew University

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Liron Barak

Krill Prize 2021
Tel-Aviv University

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Joshua Baraban

Krill Prize 2021
Ben-Gurion University

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Karam Natour

Kiefer Prize Laureate– 2020

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Schraga Schwartz

Krill Prize 2020
Weizmann Institute

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Kfir Blum

Krill Prize 2020
Weizmann Institute

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Tomer Michaeli

Krill Prize 2020
Technion

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Yuval Filmus

Krill Prize 2020
Technion

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Meirav Zehavi

Krill Prize 2020
Ben Gurion University

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Idan Hod

Krill Prize 2020
Ben Gurion University

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

Adam Teman

Krill Prize 2020
Bar-Ilan University

Adam Teman

 

 

 

Title: Efficient Circuits and Systems Design for Electronic Chips

 

 

My research deals with the design of circuits and systems that are integrated on the silicon chips that can be found in virtually any electronic system today. In the framework of my research, I search for novel methods to improve these chips in order to enable smarter, faster, cheaper and more energy-efficient products. My research team, which operates from within the EnICS Labs center at Bar-Ilan University, focuses on a wide range of research domains, including embedded memory design, hardware for artificial intelligence applications, open hardware design for efficient digital computation and more. Our research work starts at the algorithm and computer architecture levels, crossing all levels of abstraction down to the circuit and transistor level, and includes the demonstration of our novelty upon components fabricated in state-of-the-art nanometer process technologies. The outcomes of our research are integrated in digital systems of all types, from the datacenter to the mobile unit and autonomous car.

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