The Wolf Prize laureates

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Benjamin F. Cravatt III

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2022

Momoyo Kaijima & Yoshiharu Tsukamoto

“for their work that highlights the importance to architecture of its ethnographic and inhabitational characteristics, in their writings and practice”.

At a time of considerable world change, when social and cultural values have been questioned, these three are outstanding in challenging norms to advance the field of architecture and its wider influence. Whilst very different in their production, they share a common vital quality of bringing research, pedagogy and practice into critical confluence for the advancement of their field. In doing so, they reveal the degree to which art, science, and engagement with society, require values that can be interrogated and challenged, as a central part of their contribution. Conscious of the wider affects of architecture, each recipient embodies the idea of collaboration in varied ways, embracing geographic, cultural and methodological differences to be celebrated: excellence through diversity. With their radical architectural visions, they continue to be meaningful influencers of future architectural generations. They have developed the agency of architecture through an expanded field, in engaging politics, the city as the base for social action, and the imperative of reaching broader audiences.

Momoyo Kaijima is Tokyo-born and completed her Architecture degree at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, at which she later received her doctorate, as well. Today Kaijima is a Prof. of Architectural Behaviorology at ETH Zurich.

Kaijima and Tsukamoto fostered their partnership after joining forces in competitions where they achieved many successes—so much so—that they decided to found Atelier Bow-Wow in which they continue to thrive.

The prolific work of this Japanese architectural team spans over three decades. They begin each architectural project with observation: the site, those who will eventually inhabit the building, the behavior of the people in the surroundings, shared spaces, resources, and climate. With all this in mind, they will then try to push “that which exists” a bit further to create a new phenomenon.

Since 1992 when Tsukamoto and Kaijima founded their practice, they have consistently shown themselves to be exceptional practitioners, bridging the relationship between research and practice, proposing alternative ways of making architecture focused on its social affects. With the publication of ‘Made In Tokyo’ (2001) the pioneering “Behaviorology” (2010) and ‘Architectural Ethnography’ (2018), they have developed a treatise on how to translate the liminal and in-between spaces of the city into opportunities for public engagement. With a practice that is predominantly residential and adeptly made, their work on behavior gives dominance to design strategies that work bottom-up, looking at human rituals as the basis for design opportunities. This was further tested in their post 2011 tsunami project reconstructing Momonoura village. They have profoundly influenced younger generations alternative human-centered approaches to the urban environment.

Pamela Ronald

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2022

Momoyo Kaijima & Yoshiharu Tsukamoto

“for their work that highlights the importance to architecture of its ethnographic and inhabitational characteristics, in their writings and practice”.

At a time of considerable world change, when social and cultural values have been questioned, these three are outstanding in challenging norms to advance the field of architecture and its wider influence. Whilst very different in their production, they share a common vital quality of bringing research, pedagogy and practice into critical confluence for the advancement of their field. In doing so, they reveal the degree to which art, science, and engagement with society, require values that can be interrogated and challenged, as a central part of their contribution. Conscious of the wider affects of architecture, each recipient embodies the idea of collaboration in varied ways, embracing geographic, cultural and methodological differences to be celebrated: excellence through diversity. With their radical architectural visions, they continue to be meaningful influencers of future architectural generations. They have developed the agency of architecture through an expanded field, in engaging politics, the city as the base for social action, and the imperative of reaching broader audiences.

Momoyo Kaijima is Tokyo-born and completed her Architecture degree at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, at which she later received her doctorate, as well. Today Kaijima is a Prof. of Architectural Behaviorology at ETH Zurich.

Kaijima and Tsukamoto fostered their partnership after joining forces in competitions where they achieved many successes—so much so—that they decided to found Atelier Bow-Wow in which they continue to thrive.

The prolific work of this Japanese architectural team spans over three decades. They begin each architectural project with observation: the site, those who will eventually inhabit the building, the behavior of the people in the surroundings, shared spaces, resources, and climate. With all this in mind, they will then try to push “that which exists” a bit further to create a new phenomenon.

Since 1992 when Tsukamoto and Kaijima founded their practice, they have consistently shown themselves to be exceptional practitioners, bridging the relationship between research and practice, proposing alternative ways of making architecture focused on its social affects. With the publication of ‘Made In Tokyo’ (2001) the pioneering “Behaviorology” (2010) and ‘Architectural Ethnography’ (2018), they have developed a treatise on how to translate the liminal and in-between spaces of the city into opportunities for public engagement. With a practice that is predominantly residential and adeptly made, their work on behavior gives dominance to design strategies that work bottom-up, looking at human rituals as the basis for design opportunities. This was further tested in their post 2011 tsunami project reconstructing Momonoura village. They have profoundly influenced younger generations alternative human-centered approaches to the urban environment.

Ferenc Krausz

Wolf Prize Laureate in Physics

Momoyo Kaijima & Yoshiharu Tsukamoto

“for their work that highlights the importance to architecture of its ethnographic and inhabitational characteristics, in their writings and practice”.

At a time of considerable world change, when social and cultural values have been questioned, these three are outstanding in challenging norms to advance the field of architecture and its wider influence. Whilst very different in their production, they share a common vital quality of bringing research, pedagogy and practice into critical confluence for the advancement of their field. In doing so, they reveal the degree to which art, science, and engagement with society, require values that can be interrogated and challenged, as a central part of their contribution. Conscious of the wider affects of architecture, each recipient embodies the idea of collaboration in varied ways, embracing geographic, cultural and methodological differences to be celebrated: excellence through diversity. With their radical architectural visions, they continue to be meaningful influencers of future architectural generations. They have developed the agency of architecture through an expanded field, in engaging politics, the city as the base for social action, and the imperative of reaching broader audiences.

Momoyo Kaijima is Tokyo-born and completed her Architecture degree at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, at which she later received her doctorate, as well. Today Kaijima is a Prof. of Architectural Behaviorology at ETH Zurich.

Kaijima and Tsukamoto fostered their partnership after joining forces in competitions where they achieved many successes—so much so—that they decided to found Atelier Bow-Wow in which they continue to thrive.

The prolific work of this Japanese architectural team spans over three decades. They begin each architectural project with observation: the site, those who will eventually inhabit the building, the behavior of the people in the surroundings, shared spaces, resources, and climate. With all this in mind, they will then try to push “that which exists” a bit further to create a new phenomenon.

Since 1992 when Tsukamoto and Kaijima founded their practice, they have consistently shown themselves to be exceptional practitioners, bridging the relationship between research and practice, proposing alternative ways of making architecture focused on its social affects. With the publication of ‘Made In Tokyo’ (2001) the pioneering “Behaviorology” (2010) and ‘Architectural Ethnography’ (2018), they have developed a treatise on how to translate the liminal and in-between spaces of the city into opportunities for public engagement. With a practice that is predominantly residential and adeptly made, their work on behavior gives dominance to design strategies that work bottom-up, looking at human rituals as the basis for design opportunities. This was further tested in their post 2011 tsunami project reconstructing Momonoura village. They have profoundly influenced younger generations alternative human-centered approaches to the urban environment.

Paul Corkum

Wolf Prize Laureate in Physics

Momoyo Kaijima & Yoshiharu Tsukamoto

“for their work that highlights the importance to architecture of its ethnographic and inhabitational characteristics, in their writings and practice”.

At a time of considerable world change, when social and cultural values have been questioned, these three are outstanding in challenging norms to advance the field of architecture and its wider influence. Whilst very different in their production, they share a common vital quality of bringing research, pedagogy and practice into critical confluence for the advancement of their field. In doing so, they reveal the degree to which art, science, and engagement with society, require values that can be interrogated and challenged, as a central part of their contribution. Conscious of the wider affects of architecture, each recipient embodies the idea of collaboration in varied ways, embracing geographic, cultural and methodological differences to be celebrated: excellence through diversity. With their radical architectural visions, they continue to be meaningful influencers of future architectural generations. They have developed the agency of architecture through an expanded field, in engaging politics, the city as the base for social action, and the imperative of reaching broader audiences.

Momoyo Kaijima is Tokyo-born and completed her Architecture degree at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, at which she later received her doctorate, as well. Today Kaijima is a Prof. of Architectural Behaviorology at ETH Zurich.

Kaijima and Tsukamoto fostered their partnership after joining forces in competitions where they achieved many successes—so much so—that they decided to found Atelier Bow-Wow in which they continue to thrive.

The prolific work of this Japanese architectural team spans over three decades. They begin each architectural project with observation: the site, those who will eventually inhabit the building, the behavior of the people in the surroundings, shared spaces, resources, and climate. With all this in mind, they will then try to push “that which exists” a bit further to create a new phenomenon.

Since 1992 when Tsukamoto and Kaijima founded their practice, they have consistently shown themselves to be exceptional practitioners, bridging the relationship between research and practice, proposing alternative ways of making architecture focused on its social affects. With the publication of ‘Made In Tokyo’ (2001) the pioneering “Behaviorology” (2010) and ‘Architectural Ethnography’ (2018), they have developed a treatise on how to translate the liminal and in-between spaces of the city into opportunities for public engagement. With a practice that is predominantly residential and adeptly made, their work on behavior gives dominance to design strategies that work bottom-up, looking at human rituals as the basis for design opportunities. This was further tested in their post 2011 tsunami project reconstructing Momonoura village. They have profoundly influenced younger generations alternative human-centered approaches to the urban environment.

Carolyn R. Bertozzi

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2022

Momoyo Kaijima & Yoshiharu Tsukamoto

“for their work that highlights the importance to architecture of its ethnographic and inhabitational characteristics, in their writings and practice”.

At a time of considerable world change, when social and cultural values have been questioned, these three are outstanding in challenging norms to advance the field of architecture and its wider influence. Whilst very different in their production, they share a common vital quality of bringing research, pedagogy and practice into critical confluence for the advancement of their field. In doing so, they reveal the degree to which art, science, and engagement with society, require values that can be interrogated and challenged, as a central part of their contribution. Conscious of the wider affects of architecture, each recipient embodies the idea of collaboration in varied ways, embracing geographic, cultural and methodological differences to be celebrated: excellence through diversity. With their radical architectural visions, they continue to be meaningful influencers of future architectural generations. They have developed the agency of architecture through an expanded field, in engaging politics, the city as the base for social action, and the imperative of reaching broader audiences.

Momoyo Kaijima is Tokyo-born and completed her Architecture degree at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, at which she later received her doctorate, as well. Today Kaijima is a Prof. of Architectural Behaviorology at ETH Zurich.

Kaijima and Tsukamoto fostered their partnership after joining forces in competitions where they achieved many successes—so much so—that they decided to found Atelier Bow-Wow in which they continue to thrive.

The prolific work of this Japanese architectural team spans over three decades. They begin each architectural project with observation: the site, those who will eventually inhabit the building, the behavior of the people in the surroundings, shared spaces, resources, and climate. With all this in mind, they will then try to push “that which exists” a bit further to create a new phenomenon.

Since 1992 when Tsukamoto and Kaijima founded their practice, they have consistently shown themselves to be exceptional practitioners, bridging the relationship between research and practice, proposing alternative ways of making architecture focused on its social affects. With the publication of ‘Made In Tokyo’ (2001) the pioneering “Behaviorology” (2010) and ‘Architectural Ethnography’ (2018), they have developed a treatise on how to translate the liminal and in-between spaces of the city into opportunities for public engagement. With a practice that is predominantly residential and adeptly made, their work on behavior gives dominance to design strategies that work bottom-up, looking at human rituals as the basis for design opportunities. This was further tested in their post 2011 tsunami project reconstructing Momonoura village. They have profoundly influenced younger generations alternative human-centered approaches to the urban environment.

Bonnie L. Bassler

Wolf Prize Laureate in Chemistry 2022

Momoyo Kaijima & Yoshiharu Tsukamoto

“for their work that highlights the importance to architecture of its ethnographic and inhabitational characteristics, in their writings and practice”.

At a time of considerable world change, when social and cultural values have been questioned, these three are outstanding in challenging norms to advance the field of architecture and its wider influence. Whilst very different in their production, they share a common vital quality of bringing research, pedagogy and practice into critical confluence for the advancement of their field. In doing so, they reveal the degree to which art, science, and engagement with society, require values that can be interrogated and challenged, as a central part of their contribution. Conscious of the wider affects of architecture, each recipient embodies the idea of collaboration in varied ways, embracing geographic, cultural and methodological differences to be celebrated: excellence through diversity. With their radical architectural visions, they continue to be meaningful influencers of future architectural generations. They have developed the agency of architecture through an expanded field, in engaging politics, the city as the base for social action, and the imperative of reaching broader audiences.

Momoyo Kaijima is Tokyo-born and completed her Architecture degree at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, at which she later received her doctorate, as well. Today Kaijima is a Prof. of Architectural Behaviorology at ETH Zurich.

Kaijima and Tsukamoto fostered their partnership after joining forces in competitions where they achieved many successes—so much so—that they decided to found Atelier Bow-Wow in which they continue to thrive.

The prolific work of this Japanese architectural team spans over three decades. They begin each architectural project with observation: the site, those who will eventually inhabit the building, the behavior of the people in the surroundings, shared spaces, resources, and climate. With all this in mind, they will then try to push “that which exists” a bit further to create a new phenomenon.

Since 1992 when Tsukamoto and Kaijima founded their practice, they have consistently shown themselves to be exceptional practitioners, bridging the relationship between research and practice, proposing alternative ways of making architecture focused on its social affects. With the publication of ‘Made In Tokyo’ (2001) the pioneering “Behaviorology” (2010) and ‘Architectural Ethnography’ (2018), they have developed a treatise on how to translate the liminal and in-between spaces of the city into opportunities for public engagement. With a practice that is predominantly residential and adeptly made, their work on behavior gives dominance to design strategies that work bottom-up, looking at human rituals as the basis for design opportunities. This was further tested in their post 2011 tsunami project reconstructing Momonoura village. They have profoundly influenced younger generations alternative human-centered approaches to the urban environment.

Yoshiharu Tsukamoto

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2022

Momoyo Kaijima & Yoshiharu Tsukamoto

“for their work that highlights the importance to architecture of its ethnographic and inhabitational characteristics, in their writings and practice”.

At a time of considerable world change, when social and cultural values have been questioned, these three are outstanding in challenging norms to advance the field of architecture and its wider influence. Whilst very different in their production, they share a common vital quality of bringing research, pedagogy and practice into critical confluence for the advancement of their field. In doing so, they reveal the degree to which art, science, and engagement with society, require values that can be interrogated and challenged, as a central part of their contribution. Conscious of the wider affects of architecture, each recipient embodies the idea of collaboration in varied ways, embracing geographic, cultural and methodological differences to be celebrated: excellence through diversity. With their radical architectural visions, they continue to be meaningful influencers of future architectural generations. They have developed the agency of architecture through an expanded field, in engaging politics, the city as the base for social action, and the imperative of reaching broader audiences.

Momoyo Kaijima is Tokyo-born and completed her Architecture degree at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, at which she later received her doctorate, as well. Today Kaijima is a Prof. of Architectural Behaviorology at ETH Zurich.

Kaijima and Tsukamoto fostered their partnership after joining forces in competitions where they achieved many successes—so much so—that they decided to found Atelier Bow-Wow in which they continue to thrive.

The prolific work of this Japanese architectural team spans over three decades. They begin each architectural project with observation: the site, those who will eventually inhabit the building, the behavior of the people in the surroundings, shared spaces, resources, and climate. With all this in mind, they will then try to push “that which exists” a bit further to create a new phenomenon.

Since 1992 when Tsukamoto and Kaijima founded their practice, they have consistently shown themselves to be exceptional practitioners, bridging the relationship between research and practice, proposing alternative ways of making architecture focused on its social affects. With the publication of ‘Made In Tokyo’ (2001) the pioneering “Behaviorology” (2010) and ‘Architectural Ethnography’ (2018), they have developed a treatise on how to translate the liminal and in-between spaces of the city into opportunities for public engagement. With a practice that is predominantly residential and adeptly made, their work on behavior gives dominance to design strategies that work bottom-up, looking at human rituals as the basis for design opportunities. This was further tested in their post 2011 tsunami project reconstructing Momonoura village. They have profoundly influenced younger generations alternative human-centered approaches to the urban environment.

Momoyo Kaijima

Wolf Prize Laureate in Architecture 2022

Momoyo Kaijima & Yoshiharu Tsukamoto

“for their work that highlights the importance to architecture of its ethnographic and inhabitational characteristics, in their writings and practice”.

At a time of considerable world change, when social and cultural values have been questioned, these three are outstanding in challenging norms to advance the field of architecture and its wider influence. Whilst very different in their production, they share a common vital quality of bringing research, pedagogy and practice into critical confluence for the advancement of their field. In doing so, they reveal the degree to which art, science, and engagement with society, require values that can be interrogated and challenged, as a central part of their contribution. Conscious of the wider affects of architecture, each recipient embodies the idea of collaboration in varied ways, embracing geographic, cultural and methodological differences to be celebrated: excellence through diversity. With their radical architectural visions, they continue to be meaningful influencers of future architectural generations. They have developed the agency of architecture through an expanded field, in engaging politics, the city as the base for social action, and the imperative of reaching broader audiences.

Momoyo Kaijima is Tokyo-born and completed her Architecture degree at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, at which she later received her doctorate, as well. Today Kaijima is a Prof. of Architectural Behaviorology at ETH Zurich.

Kaijima and Tsukamoto fostered their partnership after joining forces in competitions where they achieved many successes—so much so—that they decided to found Atelier Bow-Wow in which they continue to thrive.

The prolific work of this Japanese architectural team spans over three decades. They begin each architectural project with observation: the site, those who will eventually inhabit the building, the behavior of the people in the surroundings, shared spaces, resources, and climate. With all this in mind, they will then try to push “that which exists” a bit further to create a new phenomenon.

Since 1992 when Tsukamoto and Kaijima founded their practice, they have consistently shown themselves to be exceptional practitioners, bridging the relationship between research and practice, proposing alternative ways of making architecture focused on its social affects. With the publication of ‘Made In Tokyo’ (2001) the pioneering “Behaviorology” (2010) and ‘Architectural Ethnography’ (2018), they have developed a treatise on how to translate the liminal and in-between spaces of the city into opportunities for public engagement. With a practice that is predominantly residential and adeptly made, their work on behavior gives dominance to design strategies that work bottom-up, looking at human rituals as the basis for design opportunities. This was further tested in their post 2011 tsunami project reconstructing Momonoura village. They have profoundly influenced younger generations alternative human-centered approaches to the urban environment.

Prizes and scholarships laureates

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Ely Kovetz

Krill Prize 2022
Ben-Gurion University

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Sivan Refaely-Abramson

Krill Prize 2022
Weizmann Institute of Science

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Moran Yassour

Krill Prize 2022
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Jonathan Ruhman

Krill Prize 2022
Bar-Ilan University

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Yehonadav Bekenstein

Kril Prize 2022
Technion

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Ittay Eyal

Krill Prize 2022
Technion

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Haitham Amal

Krill Prize 2022
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Gili Bisker

Krill Prize 2022
Tel-Aviv University

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Ron Rothblum

Krill Prize 2022
Technion

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Uri Ben-David

Krill Prize 2022
Tel-Aviv University

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Yoav Shechtman

Krill Prize 2021
Technion

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Moran Shalev Ben-Ami

Krill Prize 2021
Weizmann Institute

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Benyamin Rosental

Krill Prize 2021
Ben-Gurion University

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Ido Kaminer

Krill Prize 2021
Technion

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Tamir klein

Krill Prize 2021
Weizmann Institute

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Merav Parter

Krill Prize 2021
Weizmann Institute

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Guy Katz

Krill Prize 2021
The Hebrew University

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

Naomi Habib

Krill Prize 2021
The Hebrew University

Naomi Habib – Uncovering disease mechanisms of the aging brain: cracking the code for healthy ageing.

 

Dr. Habib’s research focuses on uncovering the mechanisms
leading to devastating and currently uncurbable brain
diseases of advanced age, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. To
tackle this challenge, Dr. Habib’s group are applying cutting
edge technologies along with computational modeling to
map molecular changes in all cells of the ageing brain at high
resolution. Their cellular maps help uncover new triggers of
the disease and also protective molecules that may promote
healthy ageing.

Specifically, within the brain, Dr. Habib is exploring the
communication between different brain cells, and beyond
the brain, She is elucidating the impact of the immune system
and of environmental risk factors. Dr. Habib group strive to
bridge the knowledge gap in ageing research by developing
new experimental models and technologies that will help
find effective treatment or prevention strategies.

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