Martinus Th. van Genuchten

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2023

Martinus Th. “Rien” van Genuchten

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

The Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Award citation:

“for his groundbreaking work in understanding water flow and predicting contaminant transport in soils”.

 

Prize share:

None

 

Martinus Theodorus Van Genuchten, born in Vught, Netherlands, received his early education at the Agricultural U, Wageningen, and his Doctorate in the United States, at the New Mexico State University. Van Genuchten has had an exemplary and influential career, with numerous collaborations across the globe. He further served as co-editor and deputy editor, of nine journals and launched the Vadose Zone Journal, dedicated to the science of the near-surface environment.

The vadose zone is the undersaturated portion of the subsurface that lies above the groundwater table. The soil and rock in the vadose zone are not fully saturated with water; that is, the pores within them contain air as well as water. The movement of water within the vadose zone is important to agriculture, contaminant transport, and flood control. It is intensively used for the cultivation of plants, construction of buildings, and disposal of waste, and crucial in determining the amount and quality of groundwater that is available for human use.

During his 40-year career, Professor Van Genuchten transformed the broad fields of soil physics and vadose zone hydrology, which are central to modern agricultural operations and climate science. He created a much-needed scientific basis for understanding fluid flow and contaminant transport processes in unsaturated soils, including their interactions with the atmosphere above and groundwater below. Contemporary vadose zone hydrology is unthinkable without his many contributions, which established links between agriculture, soil science, geology, environmental sciences, and civil engineering. Particularly important were his studies on the basic processes governing water and chemical transport in soil systems, with his work on the nonequilibrium transport of agricultural chemicals remaining a landmark.
He pioneered the representation of dual-porosity and dual-permeability models considering mobile and immobile liquid regions in unsaturated porous media, derived novel analytical and numerical solutions, and performed some of the most definitive laboratory and field experiments to test the models. His models profoundly improved predictions of complex field phenomena and motivated an avalanche of studies along similar lines to address water and chemical transport in natural soils and rocks. Because of their attractive mathematical properties and their simplicity, the “van Genuchten equations” are now universally used in numerical simulators of subsurface flow and transport processes.
Prof. van Genuchten is awarded the Wolf Prize for reshaping the disciplines of soil physics and vadose zone hydrology. He not only published hundreds of scientific journal papers but wrote user manuals of his many computer programs now being used worldwide. He brought enormous visibility and credibility to the agricultural sciences profession. He facilitated the formation of productive links between theoreticians and practitioners, young students and accomplished scientists, and institutions in developed and less-developed countries. For all his numerous contributions to agriculture, soil science, and hydrology, Prof. Genuchten receives the 2023 Wolf Prize in Agriculture.

Agriculture

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Martinus Th. van Genuchten

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2023

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Pamela Ronald

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2022

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Caroline Dean

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2020

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

David Zilberman

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2019

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Gene Robinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2018

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Trudy Mackay

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2016

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Linda J. Saif

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2015

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Leif Andersson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2014

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Jorge Dubcovsky

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2014

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Joachim Messing

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2013

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Jared M. Diamond

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2013

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

James R. Cook

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2011

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Harris A. Lewin

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2011

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

David Baulcombe

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2010

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

W. Joe Lewis

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2008/9

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

John A. Pickett

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2008/9

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

James H. Tumlinson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2008/9

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Ronald L. Phillips

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2006/7

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Michel A.J. Georges

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2006/7

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Steven D. Tanksley

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2004

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Yuan Longping

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2004

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Fuller W. Bazer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2002/3

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

R. Michael Roberts

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2002/3

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Roger N. Beachy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2001

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

James E. Womack

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2001

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Gurdev S. Khush

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 2000

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Ilan Chet

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1998

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Baldur R. Stefansson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1998

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Neal L. First

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1996/7

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Morris Schnitzer

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1995/6

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Frank J. Stevenson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1995/6

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Perry L. Adkisson

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1994/5

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Carl B. Huffaker

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1994/5

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

John E. Casida

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1993

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Shang-Fa Yang

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1991

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Jozef S. Schell

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1990

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Peter M. Biggs

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1989

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Michael Elliott

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1989

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Christopher Polge

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1988

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Charles Thibault

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1988

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Theodor O. Diener

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1987

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Ralph Riley

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1986

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Ernest R. Sears

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1986

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Robert H. Burris

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1985

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Don Kirkham

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1984

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Cornelis T. De Wit

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1984

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Wendell L. Roelofs

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1982

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

John O. Almquist

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1981

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Henry A. Lardy

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1981

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Glenn W. Salisbury

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1981

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Karl Maramorosch

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1980

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Kenneth Blaxter

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1979

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

Jay L. Lush

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1979

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

John C. Walker

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1978

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.

George F.Sprague

Wolf Prize Laureate in Agriculture 1978

George F. Sprague

 

Affiliation at the time of the award:

University of Illinois, USA

 

Award citation:

“for his outstanding research on the genetic amelioration of maize for human welfare”.

 

Prize share:

George F. Sprague 

John C. Walker

 

Professor Sprague (a geneticist – plant breeder) and Professor Walker (a plant pathologist -plant breeder) have achieved world eminence in the development of improved crop plants to the extent of greatly stabilizing the culture, increasing yields, and improving the quality of a number of major vegetable crops, and of maize – one of the world´s dominant grain crops. Each has developed novel and efficient methodology of breeding techniques and procedures. Both have been towering figures in contributing to both applied and basic research. Both have most enviable records of having trained scientific manpower for agriculture´s needs. Students of each are to be found throughout the world, many of them having established themselves as distinguished researchers, educators and/or administrators. Each awardee has served well the organizations of his respective science and agricultural industry, as well as the governments of the world.

In the annals of world agriculture, hybrid maize is the most spectacular example of the exploitation of a genetic phenomenon heterosis for increasing food production. Unquestionably Professor Sprague´s name ranks foremost in the 40-year-long history of this great achievement of agricultural science. Moreover, many of the concepts, much of the theory and, any of the breeding models, which he developed for maize, have influenced the improvement of other crop plants.

Throughout his long and distinguished scientific career, Professor Sprague has worked untiringly to link theoretical quantitative genetic theory to practical plant breeding. Among his most fruitful basic studies was the development of a mathematical genetic model for selection that led to the development of an improved gene pool of maize germ plasm. Professor Sprague´s genetic research laid the ground work, for improvement in nutritional quality in maize. A fact, which holds great promise to maize-eating nations. He conducted investigations, which demonstrated that protein quality of maize was genetically modifiable.

In summary, few people in the history of agriculture have had such a profound impact on the improvement of a major crop as has Professor Sprague.